Yeovil Pen Mill railway station

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For the station on the London Waterloo to Exeter line, see Yeovil Junction railway station.
Yeovil Pen Mill National Rail
Yeovil Pen Mill Station.jpg
Location
Place Yeovil
Local authority South Somerset
Coordinates 50°56′40″N 2°36′48″W / 50.9445°N 2.6134°W / 50.9445; -2.6134Coordinates: 50°56′40″N 2°36′48″W / 50.9445°N 2.6134°W / 50.9445; -2.6134
Grid reference ST570163
Operations
Station code YVP
Managed by Great Western Railway
Number of platforms 3 (facing 2 tracks)
DfT category E
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03   90,590
2004/05 Increase 98,536
2005/06 Increase 99,041
2006/07 Increase 0.103 million
2007/08 Increase 0.105 million
2008/09 Increase 0.111 million
2009/10 Increase 0.116 million
2010/11 Increase 0.127 million
2011/12 Increase 0.132 million
2012/13 Decrease 0.129 million
2013/14 Increase 0.133 million
2014/15 Increase 0.137 million
History
Original company Great Western Railway
1854 Opened
National RailUK railway stations

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Yeovil Pen Mill from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
UK Railways portal

Yeovil Pen Mill railway station is one of two stations serving the town of Yeovil, Somerset, England. The station is situated just under a mile to the east of the town centre.

The station is located 59.5 miles (96 km) south of Bristol Temple Meads, on the Heart of Wessex Line. The station is managed by Great Western Railway, with trains being operated by them and by South West Trains.

History[edit]

The station was opened by the Great Western Railway (GWR) as part of the Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth route on 2 February 1854. The GWR opened a locomotive depot at the station in September 1856, which operated until January 1959, when it was closed and the locomotives transferred to Yeovil Town depot.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 8 August 1913, a train overran signals and was in a rear-end collision with a passenger train, killing two people.[1]

Services[edit]

A train to Weymouth

There is generally a two-hourly service on weekdays (eight each way in total) on the Great western Railway route between Bristol Temple Meads or Westbury and Weymouth. Three trains each way call on Sundays all year, plus a further two in the summer. South West Trains also operate some services between Salisbury and Yeovil Junction via Yeovil Pen Mill which provide through trains or connections to London Waterloo.

Great Western Railway services are operated by Class 158, 150, or less frequently Class 153 diesel multiple units. During the summer some weekend trains may be operated by locomotive-hauled trains. The South West Trains services use Class 158 and 159s.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Castle Cary   Great Western Railway
Heart of Wessex Line
  Thornford
Castle Cary or Terminus   South West Trains
Heart of Wessex Line
  Yeovil Junction

Other stations in Yeovil[edit]

Railways in Yeovil

The town is also served by Yeovil Junction railway station, on the West of England Main Line, and served by South West Trains. Whilst there is a rail connection between the two lines, there are relatively few passenger trains between the two stations. The two stations are just under two miles apart by road.

According to section E of the National Routeing Guide, passengers travelling to Yeovil Junction may not travel through Pen Mill and vice versa.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hoole, Ken (1983). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 4. Truro: Atlantic Books. p. 17. ISBN 0-906899-07-9. 
  2. ^ "Routeing Guide Easements" (PDF). Routeing Guide Data. Association of Train Operating Companies. 9 March 2015. p. 17, item 000031. Retrieved 11 March 2015.