Yerba Buena Jazz Band

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A maxi single record edited in Argentina.

Lu Watters & the Yerba Buena Jazz Band is the name of the Traditional Jazz revival band founded by Lu Watters.[1] Notable members include singer and banjoist Clancy Hayes (from 1938 to 1940); clarinetist Bob Helm; trumpeter Bob Scobey; trombonist Turk Murphy; tubist/bassist Dick Lammi; and Watters himself.[2] The band broke up in 1950.

In the late 1930s, cornetist Lu Watters was playing commercial dance gigs in the San Francisco area. Not satisfied with this music, he assembled a group of musicians to play traditional jazz music. His rehearsal spot was the Big Bear Lodge on Redwood Road in the Oakland hills.[2] Rehearsing with him were trombonist Turk Murphy, trumpeter Bob Scobey, clarinetist Bob Helm, and pianist Wally Rose. His break came when the group landed a job playing at the Dawn Club on Annie Street in San Francisco. When San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen wrote a slightly disparaging piece about the band, supporters sent in many letters, creating publicity that boosted the band's popularity.

Discography[edit]

The band made several recordings for Jazz Man Records, which were issued in the UK on Melodisc Records, some which are:

  • Melodisc 1123 Original Jelly Roll Blues (Jelly Roll Morton)/ At a Georgia Camp Meeting (Mills)
  • Melodisc 1124 Daddy Do (Fred Longshaw) /Millenberg Joys
  • Melodisc 1125 Muskrat Ramble (Kid Ory)/ Smokey Mokes (Holzman)
  • Melodisc 1126 Tiger Rag/Come Back Sweet Papa (Russell / Barbarin)
  • Melodisc 1148 Creole Belles (Bodewalt)/ Chattanooga Stomp (King Oliver)
  • Melodisc 1149 Working Man Blues (King Oliver) / Big Bear Stomp (Lu Watters)
  • Melodisc 1150 Copenhagen (davis)/ Jazzin' Babies Blues (Jones)
  • Melodisc 1158 1919 Rag (arr. by Lu Watters) / Ostrich Walk (Nick La Rocca)
  • Melodisc 1170 South (Moten/Hayes)/ Richard M. Jones Blues
  • Melodisc 1180 Friendless Blues / I'm Goin' Huntin' (Blythe/Bertrand)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hall, Fred (1996-01-01). It's about Time: The Dave Brubeck Story. University of Arkansas Press. p. 51. ISBN 9781610752107. Retrieved 18 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Levin, Floyd (2002). Classic Jazz: A Personal View of the Music and the Musicians. University of California Press. p. 246. ISBN 9780520928985. Retrieved 18 November 2013. 

External links[edit]