Yitzchak Abadi

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Rabbi

Yitzchak Abadi
Rabbi Yitzchak Abadi.png
TitlePosek
Personal
Born
Yitzchak Abadi

(1933-03-12) March 12, 1933 (age 89)
ReligionJudaism
SpouseChaya
ChildrenChaim Yisrael, Nechama, Avraham, Aaron, Yehuda, Rivka
DenominationHaredi Orthodox Judaism
OccupationRabbi
PositionRosh Kollel
YeshivaKollel Ohel Torah, Lakewood Township, New Jersey
ResidenceLakewood NJ, USA

Yitzchak Abadi (born March 12, 1933) is an Orthodox Jewish Rabbi and Posek and a prominent leader of Orthodox Judaism in the United States and around the world.

Early life[edit]

Yitzchak Abadi was born in Venezuela. He moved with his parents to Tiberias, Mandatory Palestine at age 2. As a child Abadi attended school in Haifa. His studies began in the Yishuv Hachdash in Tel Aviv, Israel and continued in Yeshivat Chevron in Jerusalem. At 19 years old, he was sent by the Chazon Ish to study in Montreux, Switzerland. A year later the Chazon Ish sent Abadi to study in Lakewood, New Jersey, under the famed Rabbi Aharon Kotler.[1]

Influence[edit]

Rabbi Abadi is a posek, and his students are rabbis across the globe. After Rav Kotler's death, Rabbi Abadi emerged as one of the leading poskim for the Lakewood community. Rabbi Abadi branched out on his own in 1980, opening a premiere halacha Kollel in Lakewood. In 1993, Rabbi Abadi transferred his Kollel to Har Nof, Jerusalem, where it continued to produce scholars trained to decide halachic questions touching on every aspect of Jewish law.[1] Rabbi Abadi moved back to Lakewood in 2009.

Rav Yitzchak Abadi holding his Megilla on Purim 2013

Notable decisions[edit]

Owing to his prominence as a posek, Rabbi Abadi is asked the most difficult questions, in which he issued a number of innovative and controversial decisions. For instance, his ruling that permits writing a sefer torah through a silk screen process,[2][3][4] and a more recent ruling that wigs made with Indian hair may be used.[5] Rav Abadi also composed a short version of Birkat Hamazon based on the Rambam and other Rishonim, if it is difficult for one to say the full version that is customary, one may say this version, even initially as a first choice.

Works[edit]

Ohr Yitzchak Vol 1 [6]

Ohr Yitzchak Vol 2 [7]

Booklet on Niddah Laws [8]

Birkat Hamazon Hakatzar (based on the views of the Rambam and the other Rishonim) [9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ohel Torah Retrieved 13 April 2014.
  2. ^ "The Silk Screen Sefer Torah" (PDF). Retrieved 14 April 2014.
  3. ^ "אור יצחק - עבאדי, יצחק (page 359 of 465)" [Or Yitzhak - Abadi, Isaac (page 359 of 465)] (PDF) (in Hebrew). Hebrew Books. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  4. ^ "Ha'Emet Vahashalom Ehavu".
  5. ^ Weiss, Steven I. (28 May 2014). "Orthodox Wig Controversy Likely to Ebb, Rabbis Say". Retrieved 14 April 2014.
  6. ^ www.hebrewbooks.org https://www.hebrewbooks.org/1525/. Retrieved 9 August 2015. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ "HebrewBooks.org Sefer Detail: אור יצחק חב -- עבאדי, יצחק". hebrewbooks.org. Retrieved 2018-11-22.
  8. ^ "Rabbi Abadi Nidah". Scribd. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  9. ^ Raphael Lasry. "Birkat Hamazon Hakatzar". Retrieved 9 August 2015.
  10. ^ "Short birkat hamazon". Ohel Torah. 6 June 2018. Retrieved 2018-11-22.

External links[edit]

  • oheltorah.com A kashrut and halachah website by Rabbi Abadi's sons, including a Q&A forum answered "according to the opinions of their father, Rabbi Yitzchak Abadi."