Yoon Yong-il

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Yoon Yong-Il
Country (sports)  South Korea
Residence Seoul, South Korea
Born (1973-09-23) 23 September 1973 (age 43)
Daegu, South Korea
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Turned pro 1996
Plays Right-handed
Prize money US$190,990
Singles
Career record 20–20
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 140 (December 18, 2000)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open Q3 (1994, 1996, 1997)
French Open Q2 (2001)
Wimbledon 1R (2001)
US Open 1R (1998)
Doubles
Career record 6–12
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 188 (May 14, 2001)
Yoon Yong-il
Medal record
Tennis
Representing  South Korea
Asian Games
Gold medal – first place 1998 Bangkok Men's Singles
Gold medal – first place 1998 Bangkok Team Event
Silver medal – second place 1998 Bangkok Men's Doubles
Silver medal – second place 2002 Busan Team Event
Summer Universiade
Gold medal – first place 1995 Fukuoka Men's Singles
Gold medal – first place 1997 Catania Men's Singles
Gold medal – first place 1997 Catania Men's Doubles

Yoon Yong-Il (born September 23, 1973 in Daegu, South Korea) is a former professional South Korean tennis player.

Yoon reached his highest individual ranking on the ATP Tour on December 18, 2000, when he became World number 140. He played primarily on the Futures circuit and the Challenger circuit.

Yoon was a member of the South Korean Davis Cup team, posting a 16–10 record in singles and a 3–4 record in doubles in sixteen ties played.

Tour singles titles – all levels (7–10)[edit]

Legend (Singles)
Grand Slam (0–0)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
ATP Masters Series (0–0)
ATP Tour (0–0)
Challengers (1–2)
Futures (6–8)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. September 23, 1996 China Beijing, China Hard China Xia Jiaping 6–4, 2–6, 6–1
Winner 2. May 4, 1998 China Beijing, China Hard Japan Hideki Kaneko 6–3, 7–5
Runner-up 1. May 11, 1998 China Tianjin, China Hard Japan Hideki Kaneko 4–6, 7–6, 0–6
Runner-up 2. October 5, 1998 Japan Maishima, Japan Carpet South Korea Lee Hyung-Taik 6–7, 6–2, 4–6
Winner 3. July 5, 1999 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia Clay South Africa Rik De Voest 7–6, 7–5
Runner-up 3. July 26, 1999 United States St. Joseph, U.S. Hard France Thomas Dupre 6–4, 4–6, 1–6
Winner 4. August 9, 1999 United States Kansas City, U.S. Hard Argentina David Nalbandian 6–3, 6–7, 6–2
Winner 5. February 28, 2000 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia Hard South Korea Kwon Oh-hee 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 4. May 8, 2000 Japan Fukuoka, Japan Grass Japan Takahiro Terachi 6–2, 6–7, 1–6
Winner 6. May 15, 2000 Japan Osaka, Japan Hard Australia Paul Baccanello 6–4, 6–7, 6–4
Runner-up 5. May 22, 2000 South Korea Seoul, South Korea Clay South Korea Park Seung-kyu 5–7, 6–7
Runner-up 6. July 24, 2000 United States Winnetka, U.S. Hard Japan Takao Suzuki 2–6, 4–6
Runner-up 7. August 7, 2000 United States Binghamton, U.S. Hard Japan Takao Suzuki 1–6, 4–6
Runner-up 8. November 27, 2000 Philippines Manila, Philippines Hard Austria Zbynek Mlynarik 6–4, 0–6, 2–6
Runner-up 9. December 4, 2000 Philippines Manila, Philippines Hard Thailand Danai Udomchoke 3–6, 6–3, 5–7
Winner 7. April 21, 2003 Japan Kumamoto, Japan Hard Germany Benjamin Kohlloeffel 6–3, 6–2
Runner-up 10. December 12, 2003 South Korea Seogwipo, South Korea Clay Japan Takahiro Terachi 0–6, 5–7

External links[edit]