Yoram Hazony

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Yoram Hazony is an Israeli philosopher, Bible scholar and political theorist. He is President of The Herzl Institute[1] in Jerusalem. Hazony is known for founding The Shalem Center in Jerusalem in 1994, and leading it through its accreditation in 2013 as Shalem College, Israel's first liberal arts college.

Hazony's book The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture[2] (Cambridge, 2012) received the second place PROSE Award for best book in Theology and Religion from the American Association of Publishers.

Hazony received his B.A. from Princeton University in East Asian Studies in 1986, and his Ph.D. from Rutgers University in Political Philosophy in 1993. While a junior at Princeton he founded the Princeton Tory, a magazine for moderate and conservative thought.[3] He lives in Jerusalem with his wife Yael Hazony and nine children. He is the older brother of author David Hazony. He was born in Rehovot, Israel in 1964.

Hazony is Director of the John Templeton Foundation's project in Jewish Philosophical Theology, and is a member of the Israel Council for Higher Education committee examining general studies programs in Israel's universities and colleges.

He is author of a regular weblog on philosophy, Israel, Judaism, and higher education called Jerusalem Letters.[4]

Published works[edit]

Books
  • God of This World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming)
  • God and Politics in Esther (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016)
  • The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012)
  • The Jewish State: The Struggle for Israel's Soul (New York: Basic Books and The New Republic, 2000)
  • The Political Philosophy of Jeremiah: Theory, Elaboration, and Applications, (doctoral dissertation, 1993)
Edited books
  • Introduction to Aaron Wildavsky, Moses as Political Leader (Jerusalem: Shalem Press, 2005).
  • David Hazony, Yoram Hazony, and Michael Oren, eds., New Essays on Zionism, (Jerusalem: Shalem Press, 2006).
Translated books
  • Iddo Netanyahu, Yoni's Last Battle: the Rescue at Entebbe, 1976, Yoram Hazony, trans. (Jerusalem: Gefen, 2001).
Articles
  • An Imperfect God, New York Times, 25 November 2012.[5]

References[edit]

External links[edit]