Yoram Schweitzer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Yoram Schweitzer

Yoram Schweitzer is a Senior Research Fellow at Israel's Institute for National Security Studies (INSS) and Director of the Institute's Research Program: Terrorism and Low-Intensity Conflict.[1] During the course of 2017, Schweitzer will be contributing as a Visiting Fellow at the Center for American Progress.[2] Formerly, he served as a senior Military Intelligence officer and private consultant to the Office of the Prime Minister of Israel.

Renowned as a pioneer of international terrorism studies, Schweitzer’s areas of research include but are not limited to, the Salafi Jihadi “camp” including The Islamic State (Daesh) and its subjected partners; Al Qaeda [3] and its affiliates; Hezbollah; and other Palestinian terror groups. He is regarded as one of Israel’s leading authorities on terror related topics, including suicide [4][5] bombings in which he conducted a unique project involving extended, intimate and in-depth conversations with failed suicide bombers and their dispatchers.

Biography[edit]

From 1987 to 1998, Schweitzer intermittently headed the International Terrorism [6] Section of the Israeli Defense Force's Military Intelligence Directorate. During these years, he also served as a ranking member of the Israeli Prime Minister's MIA task force. Subsequently, Schweitzer served both as the Director of Education at Herzliya's Institute [7] for Counter-Terrorism, and as a private consultant to the Prime Minister's office on matters of counter-terrorism. In 2003 he joined the INSS, then the Jaffe Center for Strategic Studies. Mr. Schweitzer holds the rank of Lieutenant colonel (Lt-Col) in the IDF, and continues to serve and contribute in the IDF's reserve forces in his field of expertise.

Current research[edit]

Schweitzer is often considered a no-nonsense iconoclast whose opinions cannot be distinctly categorized as hawkish or dovish. He is regarded as a leading expert on suicide bombings, Jihadia Salafia and in matters pertaining to Iran and its proxy Hezbollah. Schweitzer is currently researching and publishing in the following areas:

Salafiya Jihadia: Mr. Schweitzer is one of the longest-standing researchers inquiring and analyzing the brand of global terrorism launched by groups adhering to this belief and its attendant ideology.

Suicide attacks: for over three decades, Mr. Schweitzer has explored and probed the mind of the suicide bomber as well as the aims and strategies of those who dispatch them. Pursuant to this longstanding interest, he conducted a unique, three year-long project comprising in-depth studies, analyses and interviews with failed suicide bombers,[8] suicide-bombing dispatchers, and leaders of Palestinian terror organizations—including many who remain in Israeli prisons, and others who were released as part of the exchange deal to secure the freedom of the abducted Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit. Mr. Schweitzer is similarly numbered among the world’s foremost authorities on female and underage suicide bombers.

Hostage Negotiation/MIA: Pursuant to his service in official capacities in these areas, Mr. Schweitzer continues to conduct in-depth research on the related topics of hostages and negotiations for their release.[9]

Psychological warfare: Mr. Schweitzer is currently studying and analyzing the propaganda campaigns being deployed by the Islamic State as well as by Al-Qaeda and its affiliates.[10][11][12]

Sub-conventional warfare: Mr. Schweitzer is currently exploring the tactical and strategic lessons to be gleaned from the campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan.[13]

Notable publications[edit]

  • The Islamic State: How Viable Is It? (co-editor, 2016) [14]
  • Al-Qaeda’s Odyssey to the Global Jihad (coauthored with Aviv Oreg 2014).[15]
  • Ed: Female Suicide Bombers: Dying for Equality? (2006).
  • Al-Qaeda and the Internationalization of Suicide Terrorism (2005)
  • The Globalization of Terror: The Challenge of Al - Qaida and the Response of the International Community (co-authored with Shaul Shay, 2003).[16]

References[edit]

External links[edit]