Yoshiaki Oshima

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Minor planets discovered: 61 [1]
3843 OISCA 28 February 1987
4157 Izu 11 December 1988
4261 Gekko 28 January 1989
4293 Masumi 1 November 1989
4383 Suruga 1 December 1989
4403 Kuniharu 2 March 1987
(4715) 1989 TS1 9 October 1989
4840 Otaynang 23 October 1989
(5123) 1989 BL 28 January 1989
5206 Kodomonomori 7 March 1988
(5258) 1989 AU1 1 January 1989
5282 Yamatotakeru 2 November 1988
(5353) 1989 YT 20 December 1989
5397 Vojislava 14 November 1988
5730 Yonosuke 13 October 1988
5740 Toutoumi 29 November 1989
(5810) 1988 EN 10 March 1988
(6903) 1989 XM 2 December 1989
(7284) 1989 VW 4 November 1989
(7569) 1989 BK 28 January 1989
(7753) 1988 XB 5 December 1988
(8008) 1988 TQ4 10 October 1988
(8157) 1988 XG2 15 December 1988
(8349) 1988 DH1 19 February 1988
(9174) 1989 WC3 27 November 1989
(9314) 1988 DJ1 19 February 1988
(9320) 1988 VN3 11 November 1988
(9940) 1988 VM3 11 November 1988
(10065) 1988 XK 3 December 1988
(10299) 1988 VS3 13 November 1988
(10751) 1989 UV1 29 October 1989
(11034) 1988 TG 9 October 1988
(11035) 1988 VQ3 12 November 1988
(11862) 1988 XB2 7 December 1988
(12251) 1988 TO1 9 October 1988
(12693) 1989 EZ 9 March 1989
13934 Kannami 11 December 1988
14843 Tanna 12 November 1988
(14860) 1989 WD3 27 November 1989
(15243) 1989 TU1 9 October 1989
(16426) 1988 EC 7 March 1988
(16434) 1988 VO3 11 November 1988
(16436) 1988 XL 3 December 1988
(16458) 1989 WZ2 21 November 1989
(17426) 1989 CS1 5 February 1989
(18346) 1989 WG 20 November 1989
(19134) 1988 TQ1 15 October 1988
(21018) 1988 VV1 2 November 1988
(21021) 1988 XL2 7 December 1988
(21034) 1989 WB3 25 November 1989
(26099) 1989 WH 20 November 1989
(27715) 1989 CR1 5 February 1989
(27721) 1989 WJ 20 November 1989
(30794) 1988 TR1 15 October 1988
(32785) 1989 CU1 10 February 1989
(32795) 1989 WA3 21 November 1989
(35074) 1989 UF1 25 October 1989
(37569) 1989 UG 23 October 1989
(37570) 1989 UD1 25 October 1989
(37571) 1989 UE1 25 October 1989
(69274) 1989 UZ1 29 October 1989

Yoshiaki Oshima (大島 良明 Ōshima Yoshiaki?) (born 1952) is a Japanese astronomer and prolific discoverer of 61 asteroids as credited by the Minor Planet Center.[1][2]

The outer main-belt asteroid 5592 Oshima is named after him.[2]

International asteroid monitoring project[edit]

Japan Spaceguard Association (JSGA) is keen to have astronomical education for young people and held Spaceguard Private Investigator of the Stars—the fugitives are asteroids! program in 2001. Yoshiaki Oshima participated as one of the committee member. JSGA submitted a paper on that project in a proceedings, with Oshima as a contributor.[3] [Notes 1]

JSGA held an astronomical education program as part of their International Asteroid Monitoring Project, that collaborated with the British Council and its International Schools' Observatory (ISO) program which had involved 12 teams of junior high to senior high school classes from Asian and European countries.[Notes 2]

The Private Investigator of Stars was co-sponsored by the British Council which advised the International Asteroid Monitoring Project by coordinating observatory in the Canary islands and participating laboratories for ISO. Yomiuri Shinbun newspaper held an asteroid hunting contest for the JSGA and run articles on their pages. 438 school classes and other teams signed up with 1,317 indibivisuals, and 133 teams reported the results of their observation.

JSGA based its project headquarters in its observatory called Bisei Spaceguard Center, owned by the Japan Space Forum. An optical telescope on the Canary island has been operated by the staff of Astrophysics Research Institute at John Moore University in Liverpool, and images were transmitted to each classroom via internet connection.[Notes 3]

Works[edit]

  • Isobe, S., Atsuo, A., Asher, D., Fuse, T., Hashimoto, N., Nakano, S., K. Nishiyama, Yoshiaki Oshima, Noritsugu Takahashi, J. Terazono, H. Umehara, Takeshi Urata, Makoto Yoshikawa. "Educational program of Japan Spaceguard Association using asteroid search", Spaceguard Detective Agency, Proceedings of Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - ACM 2002. International Conference, 29 July - 2 August 2002

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Spaceguard Private Investigator of the Stars, an asteroid monitoring program for the youth, was made possible by the special cooperation by the Japan Space Forum, as well as sponsorship from Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Space Development Agency of Japan along with John Moore University and Armar Observatory in the UK.[4]
  2. ^ UK has "National Schools' Observatory", an astronomical education for young people, which is held with John Moore University in Liverpool. The University operates a robotic telescope in the Canary Islands, and schools are allowed that they carry out scientific research using the remote telescope.[5][6]
  3. ^ The participating teams were supplied with a computer program "Aarteroid Catcher B-612" that JSGA developed to compare images of asteroids in the night sky. Each team will receive images from the Canary Island telescope and compare them with JSGAs' images, and the mission was monitoring asteroid collision and perhaps unknown asteroids.[7] The contest was due March 4, 2001, and Japan Spaceguard Association (JSGA) examined 133 reports for 10 days. On 14 March, the jury meeting was held, and winners were announced on Yomiuri Shinbun on 20th March. Award overview, assessment comments as well as presentation report, interviews to recipients, along with JSGA's prospects for future astronomic education and asteroid hunting projects.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 22 June 2016. Retrieved 28 June 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (5592) Oshima. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 475. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 28 June 2016. 
  3. ^ Clarke, Chandra K. "Space Exploration Advocacy in the 21st Century: The Case for Participatory Science" (PDF). citizensciencecenter.com: 27. Retrieved 2016-10-15. 
  4. ^ a b "国際小惑星監視プロジェクト 入賞者決まる" [Recipient of International Asteroid Monitoring Project is announced]. Yomiuri shinbun. 2001-03-27. Archived from the original on 2001-05-19. Retrieved 2016-10-15. 
  5. ^ "Teacher Zone, National Schools' Observatory". Retrieved 2016-10-15. 
  6. ^ "JSGA's project named "Private Investigaters of Stars - the fugitives are the asteroids!"". Japan Spaceguard Association. Retrieved 2016-10-15. 
  7. ^ "New publication: part2". Japan Spaceguard Association. Retrieved 2016-10-16.