You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go

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"You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go"
Song by Bob Dylan from the album Blood on the Tracks
Released January 1975
Recorded December 30, 1974 at Sound 80 in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Genre Folk rock
Length 2:54
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bob Dylan

"You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go" was written, performed and recorded by Bob Dylan. The Telegraph described the song as "Dylan's most fully realised masterpiece, crammed with lyrical blood and thunder and piercing observations."

The song appeared on Dylan's album Blood on the Tracks released in January 1975. According to The Telegraph, the song is the album's "simplest, breeziest song – yet it remains heartbreaking in its almost carefree surrender to the inevitability of romantic pain."[1] Dylan has not performed the song since 1976. [2]

The song was resurrected into the spotlight when Miley Cyrus and Johnzo West covered the song for Amnesty International on Chimes of Freedom: The Songs of Bob Dylan Honoring 50 Years of Amnesty International, a charity compilation album released on January 24, 2012 featuring Bob Dylan covers.[3] The album debuted in the U.S at number 11 on the Billboard 200 with 22,000 copies sold.[4]

Lyrics[edit]

The song's lyrics evoke multiple interpretations, from a confessional style of writing to Dylan's claims that the album was inspired by literature to the lyrics being Dylan's most masterfully written love poem. Many believe the song is a confessional style of Dylan's relationship issues with his wife during the mid-70s when they were separated. Additionally, Ellen Bernstein, a girlfriend of Dylan's in 1974 while he was separated from his wife, claims that the song was about their relationship.[5]

However in interviews Dylan claimed the song was inspired by literature. Rolling Stone reported that in Dylan's memoir, Chronicles: Volume One, "Dylan was assumed to be referring to Blood on the Tracks when he wrote: “I would even record an entire album based on Chekhov short stories. Critics thought it was autobiographical – that was fine.” [6]

In a Rolling Stone article, Jim James described the song as the "essence of love. He's describing everything so viscerally. I can almost smell the trees and different people I've known over the years, the flowers, the sunlight – the way things look when you're falling in love and how that turns in on itself when you have to leave or move on or life changes you or changes the other person. He's reflecting on it in such a beautiful way, saying that person will always be a part of him. He'll see her everywhere."[7]

Covers and references[edit]

Miley Cyrus with Johnzo West covered the song for Amnesty International on Chimes of Freedom: Songs of Bob Dylan Honoring 50 Years of Amnesty International.[8] According to Sean Curnyn's review of the cover, there were "an explosion of amateur performers on YouTube who have been inspired by Miley and are clearly doing their versions of her version." [9]

Elvis Costello covered the song on the bonus disk for Kojak Variety.

The song has been covered by many more artists including Shawn Colvin, Mary Lou Lord, Mary Lee's Corvette, Maria Muldaur, Naked Eyes, and Rhett Miller, among others.

Saradha Koirala references the song in her novel Lonesome When You Go [10]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ McCormick, Neil (18 November 2013). "Bob Dylan: 30 greatest songs". Telegraph. Retrieved 2016-08-07. 
  2. ^ Willman, Chris (21 January 2015). "Dylan's Bloody-Best Album: 40 Facts About the 40-Year-Old 'Blood on the Tracks'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2016-08-07. 
  3. ^ Wilson, Greg (October 27, 2011). "Miley Cyrus to Cover Bob Dylan on New Album". NBC. Retrieved 7 August 2016. 
  4. ^ Chimes of Freedom Debuts at #11 on Billboard! Amnesty International. Retrieved February 2, 2011.
  5. ^ Willman, Chris (21 January 2015). "Dylan's Bloody-Best Album: 40 Facts About the 40-Year-Old 'Blood on the Tracks'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2016-08-07. 
  6. ^ Willman, Chris (21 January 2015). "Dylan's Bloody-Best Album: 40 Facts About the 40-Year-Old 'Blood on the Tracks'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2016-08-07. 
  7. ^ McCormick, Neil (24 May 2016). "Bob Dylan: 30 greatest songs". Telegraph. Retrieved 2016-08-07. 
  8. ^ Wilson, Greg (October 27, 2011). "Miley Cyrus to Cover Bob Dylan on New Album". NBC. Retrieved October 28, 2011. 
  9. ^ Curnyn, Sean (31 March 2012). ""You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go": A new standard?". Cinch Review. Retrieved 2016-08-07. 
  10. ^ ""Lonesome When You Go by Saradha Koirala": Goodreads". 

External links[edit]