Young (surname)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The surname Young has several origins.

In some cases — particularly in England, Northern Ireland, and Scotland – the surname is derived from the Middle English yunge, yonge ("young"); This particular surname usually originated to distinguish a younger son.

In other cases, the surname is an Americanization of any number of like-sounding, or cognate surnames in other languages. For example: the German Jung and Junk; the Dutch Jong; and the French Lejeune and Lajeunesse. The surname can also be a form of the French Dion or Guyon.

In yet other cases, it is a romanization of Chinese Yang (楊/杨).[1][2] Very rarely, it may be a romanization of the Korean surnames Yong (용; 龍) or Yeong (영; 永/榮/影); however, if seen in a Korean name, it is far more likely that Young is a portion of the given name instead.[3]

Young is the 49th-most common surname in England; 22nd in Scotland and 11th in New Zealand.[4]

Notable people with this surname include:

A[edit]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

F[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

J[edit]

K[edit]

L[edit]

M[edit]

N[edit]

  • Ned Young (1766–1800), sailor
  • Nedrick Young (1914–1968), screenwriter often blacklisted during the 1950s and 1960s
  • Neil Young (born 1945), Canadian singer-songwriter and musician

O[edit]

  • Oliver Young (1855–1908), politician
  • Otto Young (1844–1906), German American businessman
  • Owen D. Young (1874–1962), founder of RCA and diplomat; Time Man of the Year for 1929

P[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

V[edit]

W[edit]

Y[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Young at Yutopian Names
  2. ^ Young Family History, Ancestry.com, retrieved 17 May 2013 
  3. ^ The latter surname is uncommon; according to the 2000 South Korean census, only 259 South Korean citizens had this surname. The former surname is more common, at 14,067 citizens, but when they romanize it, for example in their South Korean passports, nearly all of them (97%, in one sample from 2007) spell it Yong rather than Young. In contrast, given names beginning with Yeong/Young were some of South Korea's most popular names for baby boys in the 1940s through 1960s. 성씨 로마자 표기 방안: 마련을 위한 토론회 [Plan for romanisation of surnames: a preparatory discussion]. National Institute of the Korean Language. 25 June 2009. p. 60. Retrieved 22 October 2015.  "행정구역(구시군)/성씨·본관별 가구 및 인구" [Family names by administrative region (district, city, county): separated by bon-gwan, households and individuals]. Korean Statistical Information Service. Retrieved 23 October 2015.  이진희 [Yi Jin-hui] (28 January 2009). "너도 민준이니… 어! 또 서연이야" [You're also Min-jun ... Oh! Another Seo-yeon?]. Hankook Ilbo. Retrieved 27 October 2015. 
  4. ^ Young Surname at Forebears