Younger (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Younger
Younger, written as cursive in a black ink style on a white background
Genre
Created by Darren Star
Based on Younger
by Pamela Redmond Satran
Starring
Composer(s) Chris Alan Lee
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 57 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
  • Darren Star
  • Larry W. Jones
  • Keith Cox
  • Tony Hernandez
Production location(s) New York City, New York
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 20–25 minutes
Production company(s)
  • Darren Star Productions
  • Jax Media
  • TV Land Original Productions
Release
Original network TV Land
Original release March 31, 2015 (2015-03-31) – present
External links
Website

Younger is an American comedy-drama television series created and produced by Darren Star, based on the 2005 novel of the same name by Pamela Redmond Satran. The single-camera series stars Sutton Foster as the lead character, with Hilary Duff, Debi Mazar, Miriam Shor, Nico Tortorella, Molly Bernard and Peter Hermann co-starring in other main roles.[1] The series premiered on March 31, 2015, on TV Land and received generally positive reviews from critics.[2][3] It was renewed for a 12-episode second season in April 2015, and before the premiere of the second season on January 13, 2016, it was renewed for a third season, which began airing on September 28, 2016.[4] On June 14, 2016, the show was renewed for a fourth season,[5] which premiered on June 28, 2017.[6] On April 20, 2017, the show was renewed for a fifth season ahead of its fourth season premiere.[7] The fifth season premiered on June 5, 2018.[8] On June 4, 2018, the show was renewed for a sixth season.[9]

Premise[edit]

Liza Miller (Sutton Foster) is a recently divorced 40-year-old mother. As her teenage daughter, Caitlin (Tessa Albertson), studies abroad in India, Liza has to figure out a way to support herself and her daughter since her ex-husband's gambling addiction has left them in a financial hole, losing all their savings and their house. Following her ambitions from college, Liza attempts to get a job in publishing, but has to start at the bottom, which proves difficult for a woman of her age. During her hunt, she meets Josh (Nico Tortorella), a 26-year-old tattoo artist who thinks that they are about the same age. Maggie (Debi Mazar), Liza's best friend, comes up with the idea of giving Liza a makeover in order to pass her off as a 26-year-old. Ultimately, she becomes an assistant to Diana Trout (Miriam Shor), at the publishing firm Empirical Press, where she befriends Kelsey Peters (Hilary Duff), her 20-something co-worker.

Episodes[edit]

SeasonEpisodesOriginally aired
First airedLast aired
112March 31, 2015 (2015-03-31)June 9, 2015 (2015-06-09)
212January 13, 2016 (2016-01-13)March 23, 2016 (2016-03-23)
312September 28, 2016 (2016-09-28)December 14, 2016 (2016-12-14)
412June 28, 2017 (2017-06-28)September 13, 2017 (2017-09-13)
512June 5, 2018 (2018-06-05)August 28, 2018 (2018-08-28)[10]

Cast and characters[edit]

Main[edit]

  • Sutton Foster as Leslie "Liza" Miller: A shy, eager-to-please 40-year-old divorced mother and the show's protagonist.[11] Liza was married to David Miller, who cheated on her with a younger woman; the marriage's result is their only daughter Caitlin. In the first season, Liza encounters Josh in a pub and she gets surprised when Josh doesn't realize that she is older than she looks; that way, Liza passes off as a 26-year-old along with a makeover done by Maggie. Armed with confidence, Liza lands a job as an assistant to Diana Trout at Empirical Press. Liza quickly befriends co-worker Kelsey Peters, despite lying to everyone about her actual age.
  • Debi Mazar as Maggie Amato: Liza's old-fashioned, artsy, sharp-tongued lesbian best friend and roommate.[12]
  • Miriam Shor as Diana Trout: Liza's temperamental boss, who works as head of marketing at Empirical Press.[13]
  • Nico Tortorella as Josh: An intense, blowzy and friendly tattoo artist who owns his studio.[14]
  • Hilary Duff as Kelsey Peters: A beautiful, sophisticated, confident and ambitious 26-year-old book editor at Empirical Press who befriends Liza after they start working together.[15]
  • Molly Bernard as Lauren Heller: A fierce, snooty and funny 20-something completely immersed in social media-related stuff. Bernard was promoted to series regular in the second season.[16]
  • Peter Hermann as Charles Brooks: The eager-to-help, good-looking head of the company at Empirical Press. Hermann was promoted to series regular in the second season.[17]
  • Charles Michael Davis as Zane Anders (season 5; recurring season 4):[18] An editor from Lachlan Flynn's publisher who starts a race with Kelsey to discover who's best.[19] They soon begin dating; after, Zane is hired by Charles to work at Empirical Press, side by side with Kelsey.

Recurring[edit]

  • Dan Amboyer as Thad and Chad Weber: Twin brothers with estranged behavior. Thad was Kelsey's boyfriend, until his death.[20] Afterwards, Chad appeared and began to pursue Kelsey.
  • Tessa Albertson as Caitlin Miller: Liza's funny and cold-living daughter.[21]
  • Thorbjørn Harr as Anton Björnberg: A Swedish writer who got his book signed at Empirical Press. He and Kelsey were having an affair while Kelsey was working on his book.[22]
  • Paul Fitzgerald as David Taylor: Liza's ex-husband and Caitlin's father.[23]
  • Jon Gabrus as Gabe: One of Josh's nerdy friends.
  • Kathy Najimy as Denise Heller: Lauren's mother.
  • Michael Urie as Redmond: A flamboyant author manager and social media icon.[24]
  • Noah Robbins as Bryce Reiger: A 20-something tech billionaire who is interested in investing in Empirical.[25]
  • Ben Rappaport as Max Horowitz: Lauren's ex-boyfriend.[26]
  • Jay Wilkison as Colin McNichol: A writer that infatuates Kelsey.[27]
  • Mather Zickel as Dr. Richard Caldwell: A doctor who starts a relationship with Diana.[27]
  • Meredith Hagner as Montana Goldberg / Amy: A barista friend of Maggie. She starts working as Maggie's assistant and hooking up with Josh, but he soon discovers that she was copying Maggie's arts.[19]
  • Aasif Mandvi as Jay Malick: A man who discovers Liza's secret and befriends her.[28]
  • Burke Moses as Lachlan Flynn: A spy novelist who becomes the motive of Zane and Kelsey's quarrel.[19]
  • Jennifer Westfeldt as Pauline Turner-Brooks: Charles' ex-wife, with whom he has two daughters, and who naively believes that they can get back together.[29]
  • Phoebe Dynevor as Clare: An Irish citizen who begins dating Josh after Liza's recommendation. She and Josh then plan a green card marriage in Ireland.[30]

Guest[edit]

  • Martha Plimpton as Cheryl Sussman: A wicked woman who learns of Liza's secret and threatens to expose her.[31]
  • Richard Masur as Edward L.L. Moore: The writer of Crown of Kings, one of Empirical Press' biggest-selling novel series, which is a homage to George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire. The character himself is a homage to Martin, having similarity to Martin's physical traits.[20]
  • Camryn Manheim as Dr. Jane Wray: A famous therapist who records a podcast which inspires a book called The Deciding Decade.[32]
  • Lois Smith as Belinda Lacroix: A romance novelist, one of Empirical Press' oldest members. After decades of successful works, she dies during a launch with Liza.[33]

Production[edit]

Development and casting[edit]

The series is based on the Pamela Redmond Satran novel of the same name. In October 2013, TV Land ordered the pilot from creator and executive producer Darren Star.[34] Patricia Field, who worked with Star on Sex and the City, is a costume consultant on the production.[35] The pilot was picked up to series in April 2014 with a 12-episode order.[1] On April 21, 2015, Younger was renewed for a second season of 12 episodes, which premiered January 13, 2016. After a recurring role in the first season, Molly Bernard was added to the main cast.[36][17]

On March 14, 2018, it was announced that Christian Borle will appear in the fifth season in a guest starring role playing the journalist Don Ridley in two episodes.[37] On May 4, 2018, it was confirmed that Laura Benanti will appear in two episodes playing a self-made billionaire named Quinn.[38]

Release[edit]

In June 2018, the series will show a first look at the second episode of the fifth season, as well as a panel discussion with creator and executive producer Darren Star and cast members during the opening night screening at the annual ATX Television Festival in Austin, Texas.[39]

Lately, the book "Marriage vacation" mentioned in TV series, was launched in real life, published by Simon & Schuster. In the series, the author of the book is Pauline Turner Brooks (Jennifer Westfeldt).[40][41][42]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

Younger has received positive reviews from critics. Rotten Tomatoes gives the first season an approval rating of 97% based on 35 reviews, and an average rating of 7.6/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Darren Star's witty writing and Sutton Foster's charisma help elevate Younger above some of TV Land's previous sitcoms."[43] Metacritic gives the first season a weighted average score of 75 out of 100, based on 20 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[44]

On Rotten Tomatoes, the second season has an approval rating of 100% based on 7 reviews, and an average rating of 7.1/10.[45] Metacritic gave the season a score of 74 out of 100, based on reviews from 4 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[46]

Brian Lowry of Variety gave the series a mostly positive review, describing it as "not perfect but highly watchable" and pointing out that "inevitably, there are stereotypical aspects on both sides of the age gap — from the flakiness of Kelsey's contemporaries to Diana too often coming across as a bitter scold — but the series seldom pitches so far across those lines as to be unable to find its way back."[47]

On the New York magazine website Vulture.com, Margaret Lyons also gave a mostly positive review, describing "a sweetness to the series, an almost admiration for the various crummy behaviors [of the characters]." She went on to say that she wished the show "had a longer first season not just because I liked it, but more because it's featherweight, and as its current run stands, might have been better off as a feature-length rom-com."[48] Megan Garber reviewed the show for The Atlantic saying, "Younger, a fairy tale fit for basic cable, is a treacly confection of a show: witty but not wise, delightful but not deep. And yet—like its creator Darren Star’s previous exploration of age and sexuality and identity in a tumultuous time, Sex and the City—it offers, almost in spite of itself, deep insights into the culture of the moment."[49]

Tom Conroy of Media Life Magazine criticized the show mainly for portraying Sutton Foster's character Liza with "early-middle-age cluelessness", featuring "particularly silly" publishing-industry details and presenting "a relationship between an educated 40-year-old mother and a 26-year-old college dropout" that, in his belief, "has nowhere to go."[50]

Darcie Wilder of Vice wrote in her review: "Younger is unexpectedly addictive, nothing short of extremely soothing and pleasurable to watch. It's a bedtime story that's supposed to lull but is too engaging to ever actually let you doze off. Usually when I binge, there's a hard out when I finally get caught up to real time, entering the headspace of its regular audience and eventually losing interest—but that hasn't happened with Younger, not yet."[51]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Nominee Result Ref.
2015 MTV Fandom Award Best New Fandom Younger Nominated [52]
Teen Choice Awards Choice Breakout TV Show Nominated [53][54]
Online Film & Television Association Best Actress in a Comedy Series Sutton Foster Nominated [55]
Adweek Hot List Television Awards Best New Comedy Series Younger Won [56]
2016 People's Choice Awards Favorite Cable TV Actress Hilary Duff Nominated [57]
Women's Image Network Award Best Actress in a Comedy Series Sutton Foster Nominated [58]
Best Writing in a Comedy Series Alison Brown Nominated
Hollywood Music in Media Awards Best Musical Supervision- Television Robin Urdang Nominated [59]
2017 People's Choice Awards Favorite Cable TV Comedy Younger Nominated [60]
Favorite Cable TV Actress Hilary Duff Nominated
Women's Image Network Award Best Actress in a Comedy Series Sutton Foster Nominated [61][62]
Best Comedy Series Younger Nominated
Teen Choice Awards Choice Summer TV Actress Hilary Duff Nominated [63][64]
2018 Critics' Choice Television Awards Best Actress in a Comedy Series Sutton Foster Nominated [65][66]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie (April 14, 2014). "TV Land Picks Up Darren Star's Comedy 'Younger' To Series". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved April 14, 2014. 
  2. ^ "TV Land Releases Extended Scene from New Comedy 'Younger' Featuring Sutton Foster and Hilary Duff" (PDF) (Press release). TV Land. 4 December 2014. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  3. ^ TV Land press release (December 4, 2014). "Video: TV Land Releases Extended Scene from New Comedy "Younger" Featuring Sutton Foster and Hilary Duff". The Futon Critic. Retrieved 14 January 2016. 
  4. ^ Holloway, Daniel (January 6, 2016). "'Younger' Renewed for Season 3 by TV Land". TheWrap. The Wrap News Inc. Retrieved January 6, 2016. 
  5. ^ "'Younger' Gets Early Season 4 Renewal at TV Land". TheWrap. 2016-06-14. Retrieved 2016-06-14. 
  6. ^ "Younger". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2017-04-03. 
  7. ^ Nakamura, Reid (April 20, 2017). "TV Land Renews 'Younger' and 'Teachers' for Additional Seasons". TheWrap. The Wrap News Inc. Retrieved April 20, 2017. 
  8. ^ Pedersen, Erik (March 21, 2018). "'Younger' Season 5: Premiere Date & 360° Video For Darren Star's TV Land Series". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved March 21, 2018. 
  9. ^ "'Younger' Renewed For Season 6 By TV Land". Deadline Hollywood (in en=us). 2018-06-04. 
  10. ^ https://tvlistings.zap2it.com/overview.html?programSeriesId=SH02022010&tmsId=SH020220100000&from=sl&aid=gapzap
  11. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (December 6, 2013). "'Bunheads' Sutton Foster to Star in TV Land's Darren Star Pilot (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved January 7, 2016. 
  12. ^ Gennis, Sadie (February 7, 2014). "Sutton Foster, Hilary Duff and Debi Mazar to Star in Darren Star's TV Land Pilot". TV Guide. NTVB Media. Retrieved January 7, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Miriam Shor Joins 'Younger'; Austin Stowell Boards 'Public Morals'". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Media Corporation. January 27, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2016. 
  14. ^ ""Younger," Darren Star's new single camera comedy to premiere Tuesday, March 31 at 10pm ET/PT on TV Land" (PDF) (Press release). TV Land. 2 October 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Hilary Duff Returns To TV In New Series, 'Younger'". The Huffington Post. AOL (Verizon Communications). January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2016. 
  16. ^ Petski, Denise (June 22, 2015). "Molly Bernard Upped To Regular On 'Younger'; Noah Centineo Joins 'The Fosters'". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved January 7, 2016. 
  17. ^ a b Goldberg, Lesley (April 21, 2015). "TV Land's 'Younger' Renewed for Second Season". The Hollywood Reporter. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 
  18. ^ Swift, Andy (February 21, 2018). "Younger: Charles Michael Davis Promoted to Series Regular". TVLine. Retrieved February 21, 2018. 
  19. ^ a b c Fremont, Maggie (July 26, 2017). "Younger Recap: The H.E.A." Vulture. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  20. ^ a b Hoffman, Kim (March 17, 2016). ""Younger" recap (2.11): Secrets and Liza". After Ellen. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  21. ^ Aviles, Araceli (August 11, 2017). "Younger Review: A Kiss Is Never Just A Kiss". TV Overmind. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  22. ^ Planje, Alex (April 14, 2015). "Younger: 'Exes'". The A.V. Club. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  23. ^ "A Titanic Problem". Younger. Season 5. Episode 2. June 12, 2018. TV Land. 
  24. ^ Star, Darren (November 30, 2016). "Summer Friday". Younger. Season 3. Episode 9. TV Land. 
  25. ^ Stillwell, Alexandra (October 11, 2016). "Younger - The Marshmallow Experiment - Review". SpoilerTV. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  26. ^ Barrera, Ivanna (December 20, 2016). "TV Review: Younger Season 3, Two-Part Finale". The Young Folks. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  27. ^ a b Pavlica, Carissa (December 7, 2016). "Younger Season 3 Episode 10 Review: Pigeons, Parrots and Storks". TV Fanatic. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  28. ^ Pavlica, Carissa (August 2, 2017). "Younger Season 4 Episode 6 Review: A Close Shave". TV Fanatic. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  29. ^ Fremont, Maggie (August 9, 2017). "Younger Recap: The Hard Cupcake". Vulture. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  30. ^ Shattuck, Kathryn (September 13, 2017). "'Younger' Yanks the Rug Out From Under Viewers — and Star". The New York Times. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  31. ^ Hoffman, Kim (June 10, 2015). ""Younger" recap (1.12): The Old Ma'am and The C". After Ellen. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  32. ^ Hoffman, Kim (February 25, 2016). ""Younger" recap (2.8): Beyond Therapy". After Ellen. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  33. ^ Fremont, Maggie (July 19, 2017). "Younger Recap: Men Are Just Candy". Vulture. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  34. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (October 21, 2013). "Darren Star's Comedy 'Younger' Gets Cast-Contingent Pilot Order At TV Land". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved January 12, 2016. 
  35. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (February 7, 2014). "Debi Mazar Joins TV Land Pilot 'Younger', Set For 'Entourage' Movie". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved January 12, 2016. 
  36. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (April 21, 2015). "'Younger' Renewed For Season 2 By TV Land". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  37. ^ Turchiano, Danielle (March 14, 2018). "'Younger' Books Christian Borle for Season 5 (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved May 5, 2018. 
  38. ^ Swift, Andy (May 4, 2018). "Younger Books Laura Benanti to Play Self-Made Billionaire in Season 5". TVLine. Retrieved May 5, 2018. 
  39. ^ Turchiano, Danielle (April 18, 2018). "ATX Television Festival Adds 'Station 19,' 'Genius' and 'Younger' to Programming Lineup". Variety. Retrieved May 5, 2018. 
  40. ^ Berger, Sarah (2018-06-12). "The fake novel in hit TV show 'Younger' is now a real book". CNBC. Retrieved 2018-06-20. 
  41. ^ "The "Younger" Book Charles' Wife Wrote Is Real And I Actually Read It". BuzzFeed. Retrieved 2018-06-20. 
  42. ^ Chung, Nicole Y. (2018-05-30). "Review | 'Younger' fans: You can finally read the sexy novel that shocked Liza". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2018-06-20. 
  43. ^ "Younger: Season 1". Rotten Tomatoes. Flixster. Retrieved October 27, 2016. 
  44. ^ "Younger". Metacritic. CBS Interactive (CBS Corporation). Retrieved January 6, 2016. 
  45. ^ "Younger: Season 2". Rotten Tomatoes. Flixster. Retrieved October 27, 2016. 
  46. ^ "Younger: Season 2". Metacritic. 
  47. ^ Lowry, Brian (March 30, 2015). "TV Review: 'Younger'". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  48. ^ Lyons, Margaret (March 31, 2015). "Weird Loners, Younger, and Shows That Like (or Hate) Their Own Characters". Vulture.com. New York Media, LLC. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  49. ^ Garber, Megan (January 27, 2016). "Younger and the Age of Agelessness". The Atlantic. Retrieved October 27, 2016. 
  50. ^ Conroy, Tom (March 25, 2015). "'Younger,' don't look too closely". Media Life Magazine. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  51. ^ Wilder, Darcie (September 15, 2017). "TV Land's best, brightest show is perfect when you're looking to disappear into another, more optimistic world". Vice magazine. New York City: Vice Media. ISSN 1077-6788. OCLC 30856250. Retrieved September 16, 2017. 
  52. ^ "Best New Fandom of the Year - Vote for 2015 MTV Fandom Awards". mtv.com. Retrieved August 11, 2015. 
  53. ^ Johnson, Zach (July 8, 2015). "Teen Choice Awards 2015 Nominees: Wave 2 Revealed!". E! Online. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  54. ^ "WINNERS OF TEEN CHOICE 2015 ANNOUNCED". Teen Choice Awards. FOX. August 16, 2015. Archived from the original on August 18, 2015. Retrieved August 17, 2015. 
  55. ^ "Online Film & Television Association Awards". ofta.cinemasight.com. Retrieved October 7, 2015. 
  56. ^ "Hot List: What Are the Best Shows of 2015? Vote Your Picks for TV and Streaming". adweek.com. Retrieved October 7, 2015. 
  57. ^ "2016 Nominees & Winners". People's Choice Awards. Retrieved October 3, 2015. 
  58. ^ "Women's Image Network Announces their Women's Image Awards 17 Nominees #TheWINAwards". January 14, 2016. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  59. ^ "2016 HMMA Music in Visual Media nominations". Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  60. ^ Hipes, Patrick (November 15, 2016). "People's Choice Awards Nominees Set". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Business Media, LLC. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  61. ^ "Award Season: Women's Image Network announces its 18th Women's Image Awards Film and Television Nominees". January 25, 2017. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  62. ^ "18th Women's Image Awards – Complete List of Winners". Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  63. ^ Vulpo, Mike (July 12, 2017). "Teen Choice Awards 2017 Reveal "Second Wave" of Nominations". E! Online. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  64. ^ Ramos, Dino-Ray (August 13, 2017). "Teen Choice Awards 2017 Winners: 'Wonder Woman', 'Beauty And The Beast', 'Riverdale' Top List, Miley Cyrus No-Show". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Business Media, LLC. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  65. ^ Dixon, Marcus James (December 6, 2017). "Critics' Choice TV Awards nominations 2018: Full list led by Netflix, 'Feud: Bette and Joan,' 'Big Little Lies'". Gold Derby. Penske Business Media, LLC. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 
  66. ^ Nolfi, Joey (January 11, 2018). "Critics' Choice Awards winners 2018: Full list". EW.com. Time Inc. Retrieved February 1, 2018. 

External links[edit]