Yugoslav Americans

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Yugoslav Americans
Jugoslavenski Amerikanci
Југословенски Американци
Jugoslovanski Američani
Total population
210,395 (2021)[1]
Languages
American English, Serbo-Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene
Albanian (to a lesser extent)
Religion
Christianity (majority), Islam (minority)
Related ethnic groups
Yugoslav Canadians, European Americans

Yugoslav Americans are Americans of full or partial Yugoslav ancestry. In the 2021 Community Surveys, there were 210,395 people who indicated Yugoslav or Yugoslav American as their ethnic origin;[1] a steep and steady decrease from previous censuses (233,325 in 2019;[2] 276,360 in 2016[3]) and nearly a 36% decrease from the 2000 Census when there were over 328,000.[4]

The total number of Americans whose origins lie in former Yugoslavia is unknown due to conflicting definitions and identifications; in descending order these were as per 2021 American Community Survey:

Ethnic group Number[1]
Croatia Croatian Americans 398,101
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslav Americans 210,395
Serbia Serbian Americans 193,844
Slovenia Slovene Americans 162,172
Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian Americans 125,793[5]
North Macedonia Macedonian Americans 66,070[3]
Montenegro Montenegrin Americans Unknown
Kosovo Kosovar Americans[a] Unknown

References[edit]

  1. ^ The political status of Kosovo is disputed. Having unilaterally declared independence from Serbia in 2008, Kosovo is formally recognised as an independent state by 101 UN member states (with another 13 states recognising it at some point but then withdrawing their recognition) and 92 states not recognizing it, while Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own territory. Kosovar Americans are likely to identify as simply Albanian Americans instead, as the majority of Kosovars are ethnic Albanians.
  1. ^ a b c "2021 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates". American Community Survey 2021. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 19 November 2022.
  2. ^ "2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates". American Community Survey 2019. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 19 November 2022.
  3. ^ a b "2016 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates". Factfinder.census.gov. Archived from the original on 13 February 2020. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  4. ^ "2013 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates". American Community Survey 2013. United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 18 January 2019. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  5. ^ Karamehic-Oates, Adna (2020). "Borders and Integration: Becoming a Bosnian-American". Washington University Global Studies Law Review.

External links[edit]