Yugwa

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Yugwa
Hangwa 2.jpg
Type Hangwa
Place of origin Korea
Associated national cuisine Korean cuisine
Korean name
Hangul 유과
Hanja 油菓
Revised Romanization yugwa
McCune–Reischauer yugwa
IPA [ju.ɡwa]

Yugwa (유과; 油菓) is a type of hangwa (a traditional Korean snack or confection) made with glutinous rice flour and then deep-fried.[1] It is a moderately sweet, crispy snack with a hollow inside that melts in the mouth.[2]

Preparation and varieties[edit]

The making yugwa varieties starts with soaking glutinous rice in water for four to five days, after which the soaked grains are pounded into a paste or rice flour. The flour is then kneaded with cheongju (rice wine), honey, and water.[3] The dough is shaped or cut into pieces, soaked in cheongju again, then dried in the shade before being deep-fried in oil.[3] The snacks are usually fried twice. After frying, yugwa is first coated with honey, and then with coating ingredients such as toasted white and black sesame seeds, cinnamon powder, pine nuts, angelica powder, pine pollen, and puffed rice.[4] Yugwa can be white or dyed, using coloring ingredients such as pumpkin, mugwort, and black rice.[2] Spices like ginger may also be added during the making process for extra flavor.[2]

  • Gangjeong (강정), also called hangwa (한과; 漢菓), are finger-shaped yugwa.[1][5]
  • Sanja (산자; 饊子 or 糤子), also called yeonsa-gwa (연사과), are wide and flat, often square, rectangular, or rhombic yugwa.[6]
  • Binsa-gwa (빈사과) are made with the crumbs produced when cutting the dough for gangjeong or sanja.[7] The crumbs are deep-fried, mixed with jocheong (rice syrup), cooled, and cut into small cubes.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Kwon, Yong-Seok; Kim, Young; Kim, Yang-Suk; Choe, Jeong-Sook; Lee, Jin-Young (2012). "An Exploratory Study on Kwa-Jung-ryu of Head Families". Journal of the Korean Society of Food Culture (in Korean). 27 (6): 588–597. doi:10.7318/kjfc/2012.27.6.588. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "A Bite of Sweetness! Korean Desserts". Korea Tourism Organization. Retrieved 17 February 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Yugwa" 유과. Doopedia (in Korean). Doosan Corporation. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  4. ^ 윤, 서석. "Gangjeong" 강정. Encyclopedia of Korean Culture (in Korean). Academy of Korean Studies. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  5. ^ "Hangwa" 한과. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  6. ^ 윤, 서석. "Sanja" 산자. Encyclopedia of Korean Culture (in Korean). Academy of Korean Studies. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  7. ^ a b 황, 혜성. "Sanja" 빈사과. Encyclopedia of Korean Culture (in Korean). Academy of Korean Studies. Retrieved 18 August 2017.