Yvonne Maddox

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Yvonne T. Maddox
photo of Yvonne T. Maddox
Alma mater
Scientific career
Institutions

Yvonne T. Maddox is an American academic, who currently works as vice president for research at the Uniformed Services University[1] She was previously the acting director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. Her career at the National Institutes of Health also includes previous leadership roles as acting deputy director of the National Institutes of Health[2] and deputy director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Education[edit]

Yvonne T. Maddox conducts research early in her career.

Maddox received her Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Virginia Union University in 1965[3][4]

During her senior year, Maddox was accepted into medical school; her father's illness caused her to give up medical school and take a position as a technician at the Medical College of Virginia in order to provide for her parents and two brothers.[4][5] Later, after marrying and becoming a mother, Maddox enrolled in graduate school[4][5] and in 1981, she received her Ph.D. in physiology from Georgetown University.[5]

Maddox was a National Research Service Award Postdoctoral Fellow and an assistant professor of physiology in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Georgetown.[6] She also studied as a visiting scientist at the French Atomic Energy Commission in Saclay, France, and graduated from the Senior Managers in Government Program of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.[7]

Career[edit]

NIH director Francis Collins and NIMHD acting director Yvonne T. Maddox at NIMHD's first scientific operational planning meeting.

Maddox's career has focused on healthcare equity for minorities, women and children, in both the United States and abroad.[8][9] She first started working in 1965 as a blood bank technician in the Department of Medicine at the Medical College of Virginia.[4][5] From 1968 to 1985, she worked as a researcher, instructor and visiting scientist in various institutions including the Department of Inhalation Toxicology, the Department of Ophthalmology at the Washington Hospital Center, the Department of Biology at American University,[10] the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Georgetown University Medical Center,[11] the French Atomic Energy Commission,[12] and the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Georgetown.[6]

In 1985, Maddox began work as a health scientist administrator at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences,[11] where she became deputy director of the Biophysics and Physiological Sciences Program and chief of the Pharmacology and Physiological Sciences Section,[11] and acting director of the Minority Access to Research Careers Program from 1993 to 1994.[13]

Maddox meets Maria Shriver

From 1995 to 2014, Maddox was the deputy director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).[14] As deputy director, she led many federal and international efforts to improve maternal and child health, including the NICHD Safe to Sleep (formerly the Back to Sleep campaign), the NIH Down Syndrome Consortium,[15] and the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research.[16]

While deputy director of NICHD, she was also acting director of the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research and the institute's acting associate director for Prevention and International Activities.[7] Maddox was the NIH acting deputy director from January 2000 to June 2002.[6]

In 2014, Maddox became the acting director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities.[17]

In June 2015, Dr. Maddox became the Vice President for Research at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.[18]

Awards and honors[edit]

Maddox was inducted into the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Hall of Fame in recognition for her contributions in the field of medicine. She has also received several honorary degrees, served on public service and academic boards, and delivered national and international keynote scientific lectures.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yvonne Maddox to Lead USU Research Program | Uniformed Services University". usuhs.mil. Retrieved 2015-12-28.
  2. ^ "Yvonne Thompson Maddox, Ph.D." National Institutes of Health (NIH). Retrieved 2015-12-28.
  3. ^ "About VUU History". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d "Biomedical Science Careers Program" (PDF). Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d Women in Science at the National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2008. p. 98.
  6. ^ a b c "9th Annual Summer Public Health Research Institute and Videoconference on Minority Health". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  7. ^ a b "Minority Health Project Maddox Bio". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  8. ^ "NIMHD Director's Bio". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  9. ^ "9th Annual Summer Public Health Research Institute and Videoconference on Minority Health".
  10. ^ "Biomedical Science Careers Program April 2004" (PDF). Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  11. ^ a b c "NIH Record April 1995" (PDF). Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  12. ^ "World Down Syndrome Day". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  13. ^ "Director Of New Health Agency Program Determined To Elevate Status Of Minority Biomedical Scientists". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  14. ^ Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. "Not the Retiring Kind: Yvonne T. Maddox Reflects on Her 28.5 Years—and Counting—at NIH". Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  15. ^ Down Syndrome International. "World Down Syndrome Day". Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  16. ^ CNN. "First Candle's 2009 Research and Advocacy Symposium: Multimedia Proceedings". Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  17. ^ National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. "About NIMHD". Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  18. ^ USUHS Office Office of Research. "USUHS Research Personnel". Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  19. ^ "NIH Awardees November 2001". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  20. ^ "Friends of the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research News Letter". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  21. ^ "Maddox recognized for achievements". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  22. ^ Collins, Francis. "Director of NIH". nih.gov. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  23. ^ "Past AAPM&R Award Recipients". Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  24. ^ a b National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities. "Director's Page". Retrieved 13 March 2015.

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Institutes of Health.