Zach McAllister

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Zach McAllister
Zach McAllister vs. Orioles 2017.jpg
McAllister pitching for the Cleveland Indians vs. the Baltimore Orioles in 2017
Los Angeles Dodgers
Relief pitcher
Born: (1987-12-08) December 8, 1987 (age 30)
Peoria, Illinois
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
July 7, 2011, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
(through 2018 season)
Win–loss record 29–35
Earned run average 4.09
Strikeouts 542
Teams

Zachary Taylor McAllister (born December 8, 1987) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers organization. He previously played for the Cleveland Indians and the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He was drafted out of high school by the New York Yankees in 2006. After several seasons in the Yankees minor league system, he was traded to the Indians in 2010. McAllister made his major league debut in July 2011 and earned his first major league win in May 2012.

High school career[edit]

In high school, McAllister played soccer, football, basketball and baseball for Illinois Valley Central High School in Chillicothe, Illinois.

In basketball, McAllister was the starting center for IVC during his senior season. He helped lead the Ghosts to their first and only IHSA Class A boys basketball state finals. IVC lost to Seneca, 47-44 in the state championship game on March 11, 2006.[1] He scored 10 points and grabbed six rebounds in the state title game. [1] McAllister averaged 16.8 points and 7.9 rebounds on 61 percent (205-335) shooting from the field and 71 percent accuracy on free throws for the season. [2] The 6-foot-5 center was named Peoria Journal Star first-team All-Area, honorable mention all-state with The Associated Press, third-team Illinois Basketball Coaches Association and first-team all-Mid-Illini Conference.[2]

Three months later, McAllister helped guide the Grey Ghosts to the Class A baseball state finals - for the first time in program history. IVC beat Trenton Wesclin, 8-3, to win the 2006 A state championship on June 3, 2006.[3] He pitched 1/3 inning of relief in the title game - hitting a batter and giving up an RBI single before striking out the final batter to secure the win.[3] [4] IVC finished the season with a 40-2 record[5] and ranked No. 40 in the final 2006 Baseball America High School Top 50 rankings. [6]

McAllister finished his senior season with a 12-1 record, sporting a 1.04 ERA, 116 strikeouts and 13 walks. [7] He also hit .486 with 13 doubles, six home runs and 38 RBIs.[7] He was named the 2006 Peoria Journal Star Baseball Player of the Year along with first-team all-state honors from Illinois Prep Baseball Report, Chicago Tribune and Illinois High School Baseball Coaches Association.[7]

McAllister was named Gatorade Illinois Baseball Player of the Year for 2005–2006.[8]

Professional career[edit]

New York Yankees[edit]

McAllister was drafted by the New York Yankees in the third round of the 2006 Major League Baseball Draft out of Illinois Valley Central High School.[9] He went 5-2 with a 3.09 ERA in 11 appearances during the 2006 season for the Yankees' Gulf Coast League squad.[10] In 2007, McAllister was in Short Season-A State Island. He posted a 4-6 record with a 5.17 ERA and 75 strikeouts in 71.1 innings. [11]

McAllister was ranked the Yankees' sixth best prospect prior to the 2009 season, according to Baseball America,[12] and their fifth best prospect prior to the 2010 season.[13] He was named the Yankees' Minor League Pitcher of the Year in 2009 for his performance with the Double-A Trenton Thunder.[14] However, he struggled in 2010 with the Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees.[15]

McAllister pitching in the 2009 Eastern League (AA) All-Star Game

At the 2010 MLB trade deadline, the Yankees and Seattle Mariners almost completed a deal that would have sent McAllister, Jesús Montero, and David Adams to the Seattle Mariners for Cliff Lee. When the teams shared medical reports, the Mariners determined that Adams' ankle was broken, not sprained.[16] As a result, they chose to trade Lee to the Texas Rangers in a package centered on Justin Smoak.[17]

Cleveland Indians[edit]

On August 20, he was revealed to be the player to be named later in the July 30 trade between the Yankees and Cleveland Indians for Austin Kearns.[14][18] After the 2010 season, McAllister was added to the Indians' 40-man roster to protect him from the Rule 5 draft.[19]

After teammate Fausto Carmona was sent to the disabled list, McAllister was activated and made his major league debut against the Toronto Blue Jays on July 7, 2011 at Progressive Field in Cleveland.[20] McAllister earned his first MLB victory on May 7, 2012 against the Chicago White Sox.[21]

In a May 13, 2012 road game against the Boston Red Sox, McAllister started in place of injured pitcher Josh Tomlin and recorded a career-high 8 strikeouts in a 4-1 loss. McAllister pitched 7 innings and gave up 4 runs on 8 hits.[22] McAllister recorded the shortest outing of his career on August 6, pitching 1.2 innings. He gave up 9 runs, 2 earned.[23]

He was designated for assignment on August 1, 2014,[24] and optioned to the Triple-A Columbus Clippers on August 3. In 2015, he had an ERA of 3 in 61 appearances. He was 4-4 in 69 innings.

At the end of the 2016 regular season, McAllister finished with a 3.44 ERA and would be added to the postseason roster as the Indians clinched its first Central division title since 2007.[25] On October 17, 2016, McAllister made his first postseason debut as the fourth pitcher of Game 3 of the ALCS against the Blue Jays. He faced three batters before giving up one run, before being pulled in favor of Bryan Shaw.[26] During Game 2 of the World Series, McAllister made his second postseason appearance relieving Trevor Bauer. McAllister pitched through the fifth inning with two strikeouts before issuing a walk and two earned runs.[27]

In 2017, McAllister appeared in 50 games, posting a 2-2 record, striking out 66 batters, walking 21, while posting a 1.19 WHIP and a 2.61 ERA.[28] He recorded his 500th career MLB strikeout on Sept. 11, 2017 as the Indians captured their 19th win in a row. [29] McAllister avoided arbitration with the Tribe on Jan. 12, 2018 by agreeing to a one-year deal valued at $2.45 million. McAllister was designated for assignment by the Indians on August 3, 2018, and, after clearing waivers, was released on August 7.[30]

Detroit Tigers[edit]

On August 10, 2018, McAllister signed a major league contract with the Detroit Tigers.[31] Eight days later, McAllister was designated for assignment by the Tigers after playing in three games and giving up eight runs.[32] On August 21, 2018, McAllister elected free agency after clearing waivers.[33]

Los Angeles Dodgers[edit]

On August 27, 2018, the Los Angeles Dodgers signed McAllister to a minor league contract and assigned him to the Triple-A Oklahoma City Dodgers.[34] He appeared in five games, pitching six innings and allowing six earned runs.[35]

Pitching style[edit]

From 2010 to 2014, McAllister threw a four-seam and two-seam fastball in the low 90s, a cut fastball in the mid-high 80s, a changeup averaging about 80, and a curveball in the high 70s.[36] Some sources also list him as throwing a slider.[37] Since being converted into a reliever in 2015, McAllister now relies on 3 pitches only.

Personal life[edit]

In his second year hosting the Zach McAllister Baseball Camp, McAllister raised over $40,000 for Advocates for Access on January 15, 2018.[38] The camp featured 105 campers - 3rd through 8th graders.[39] He once again hosted a silent auction dinner the night before the baseball camp. There close to 200 people in attendance. Silent auction items included autographed jerseys from Hall of Famer Jim Thome, Clayton Kershaw, and Derek Jeter.[40]

McAllister hosted the inaugural Zach McAllister Baseball Camp on January 16, 2017 in Peoria, Illinois. [41] All proceeds from the camp benefited St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Advocates for Access. [42] He also held a silent auction dinner in collaboration with the baseball camp. A few items in the auction were Ben Zobrist's autographed and game-worn cleats and batting gloves, a Shaun Livingston autographed jersey, and an autographed baseball bat signed by Thome. [43] McAllister also auctioned off a pair of autographed game-worn cleats as well as one of his World Series jerseys.[44] A check presentation to Advocates for Access from McAllister for $7,500 occurred on August 10, 2017.[45]

McAllister's father, Steve played college baseball at Bradley University and was drafted by the Houston Astros in the 5th round of the 1981 Major League Baseball draft. He played in the minor league systems of the Astros and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1981-1986. He is currently a scout for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b IHSA. "Records & History". www.ihsa.org. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 
  2. ^ a b "PJStar.com - Journal Star Sports". 2006-06-14. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  3. ^ a b IHSA. "Records & History | Boys Baseball | IHSA Sports & Activities". www.ihsa.org. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  4. ^ Duvall, Adam. "Where are they now? Chris Shindley". Journal Star. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  5. ^ IHSA. "Records & History | Boys Baseball | IHSA Sports & Activities". www.ihsa.org. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  6. ^ "High School Top 50 | BaseballAmerica.com". BaseballAmerica.com. 2006-06-05. Retrieved 2017-05-02. 
  7. ^ a b c Peoria Journal Star. "Journal Star All-Star Baseball Team". www.pjstar.com. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 
  8. ^ "Gatorade Player of the Year". www.gatorade.com. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 
  9. ^ "Yankees Take Prep Pitcher, Zach McAllister". Yankees.scout.com. 2006-06-06. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  10. ^ "2009 Thunder A-Z: Zach McAllister". Mike Ashmore's Thunder Thoughts. 2010-02-12. Retrieved 2017-05-04. 
  11. ^ "2009 Thunder A-Z: Zach McAllister". Mike Ashmore's Thunder Thoughts. 2010-02-12. Retrieved 2017-05-04. 
  12. ^ "New York Yankees Top 10 Prospects, 2009". Baseball America. Retrieved December 23, 2009. 
  13. ^ "New York Yankees Top 10 Prospects, 2010". Baseball America. December 16, 2009. Retrieved December 23, 2009. 
  14. ^ a b Hoch, Bryan; Britton, Tim (2010-08-20). "Righty McAllister completes deal for Kearns | yankees.com: News". Mlb.mlb.com. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  15. ^ Ulrey, Jarrod (2010-08-18). "McAllister continues cold streak". The Times Leader. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  16. ^ Townsend, Brad; Horn, Barry; Grant, Evan (October 25, 2010). "Behind-the-scenes of Rangers' biggest win — getting Cliff Lee". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved January 19, 2012. 
  17. ^ Stone, Larry (September 23, 2011). "Brian Cashman: Jesus Montero would have been best player "by far" traded for Cliff Lee". Seattle Times. Retrieved September 28, 2011. 
  18. ^ Collins, Donnie (2010-08-20). "Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees Blog » Zach McAllister dealt to Cleveland". Blogs.thetimes-tribune.com. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  19. ^ Bastian, Jordan (November 19, 2010). "Indians add five to fill 40-man roster". Mlb.com. Major League Baseball Advanced Media. Retrieved September 14, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Travis Hafner cranks walk-off grand slame to cap Indians' comeback". Espn.com. Associated Press. July 7, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Philip Humber extends slide as Indians' Zach McAllister earns first win". ESPN.com. May 7, 2012. Retrieved August 7, 2013. 
  22. ^ Hoynes, Paul (May 12, 2012). "Cleveland Indians' road show derailed in 4-1 loss to Boston Red Sox". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved May 13, 2012. 
  23. ^ Bastian, Jordan (6 August 2012). "Trive allows 10-run inning in 10th straight loss". MLB.com. Retrieved 7 August 2012. 
  24. ^ "Indians designate Zach McAllister". ESPN.com. Associated Press. August 1, 2014. Retrieved August 2, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Indians overcome slow start to clinch AL Central title". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 
  26. ^ "Cleveland bullpen shines again, Indians up 3-0 in ALCS". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 
  27. ^ "Arrieta deals, Cubs awaken, top Indians to even Series at 1". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2016-10-27. 
  28. ^ "Zach McAllister Stats, Fantasy & News". Cleveland Indians. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 
  29. ^ "Tigers vs. Indians | 09/11/17". MLB.com. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 
  30. ^ "Zach McAllister: Released by Cleveland". CBSSports.com. August 7, 2018. 
  31. ^ Beck, Jason (August 10, 2018). "Tigers sign Zach McAllister, add to bullpen mix". MLB.com. Retrieved August 10, 2018. 
  32. ^ "Tigers summon Turner for another start, DFA McAllister". Detroit News. Retrieved 2018-08-19. 
  33. ^ "Zach McAllister Elects Free Agency". MLB Trade Rumors. Retrieved 2018-08-23. 
  34. ^ Harris, Blake (August 27, 2018). "Dodgers sign reliever Zach McAllister". SB Nation. Retrieved August 27, 2018. 
  35. ^ "2018 Oklahoma City Dodgers Statistics". Baseball Reference. Retrieved September 12, 2018. 
  36. ^ "PITCHf/x Player Card: Zach McAllister". BrooksBaseball.net. Retrieved 7 May 2012. 
  37. ^ "Zach McAllister". FanGraphs. Retrieved 7 May 2012. 
  38. ^ Staff. "Zach McAllister Baseball Camp raises $40K for Advocates for Access". Journal Star. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 
  39. ^ Staff. "Zach McAllister Baseball Camp raises $40K for Advocates for Access". Journal Star. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 
  40. ^ Staff. "Zach McAllister Baseball Camp raises $40K for Advocates for Access". Journal Star. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 
  41. ^ Star, Norm Ulrich Jr. of the Journal. "Zach McAllister baseball camp gives back to all kinds of kids". Journal Star. Retrieved 2017-05-04. 
  42. ^ Star, Norm Ulrich Jr. of the Journal. "Zach McAllister baseball camp gives back to all kinds of kids". Journal Star. Retrieved 2017-05-04. 
  43. ^ Star, Norm Ulrich Jr. of the Journal. "Zach McAllister baseball camp gives back to all kinds of kids". Journal Star. Retrieved 2017-05-04. 
  44. ^ Star, Norm Ulrich Jr. of the Journal. "Zach McAllister baseball camp gives back to all kinds of kids". Journal Star. Retrieved 2017-05-04. 
  45. ^ McAllister, Zach (11 August 2017). "The Zach McAllister Baseball Camp was proud to present Advocates for Access with a check for $7,500 on Thursday night. @Indianspic.twitter.com/eDaphMRkwN". @ZMBC34. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 

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