Zana Fraillon

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Zana Fraillon
BornJanuary 1981
Melbourne, Australia
OccupationTeacher/Writer
NationalityAustralian
Website
zanafraillon.com

Zana Fraillon (born 1981) is an Australian writer of fiction for children and young adults based in Melbourne, Australia. Fraillon is known for allowing young readers to examine human rights abuses within fiction and in 2017 she won an Amnesty CILIP Honour for her book The Bone Sparrow which highlights the plight of the Rohingya people.[1]

Biography[edit]

Fraillon was born in Melbourne and spent her early childhood in San Francisco. She was an avid reader as a child and grew up surrounded by books. She attributes a vision problem that was not diagnosed until she was seven as the reason she was more focussed on books than the world around her. Fraillon studied history, spent a year teaching in China and returned to Melbourne to study and work as a teacher. Fraillon is from a family of writers and began writing fun picture books with her son. A friend encouraged her to submit these to a publisher and her writing career was born.[2][3]

Bibliography[edit]

  • When No One's Looking At the Zoo Hardie Grant Egmont 2009[4]
  • When No One's Looking On the Farm Hardie Grant Egmont 2012[5]
  • Monstrum House Hardie Grant Egmont 2012[6]
  • No Stars to Wish On Allen & Unwin 2014[7]
  • The Bone Sparrow Lothian Children's Books 2016[8]
  • The Ones That Disappeared Hachette Children's Group 2017[8]
  • Wisp - A Story of Hope Lothian Children's Books 2018[8]
  • The Lost Soul Atlas Lothian Children's Books 2020[8]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Amnesty CILIP Honour winners 2017". amnesty.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  2. ^ "No Stars to Wish On Zana Fraillon". allenandunwin.com. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  3. ^ "Isolation Publicity with Zana Fraillon". ashleighmeikle.com.au. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  4. ^ "When No-One's Looking Masciullo, Lucia Fraillon, Zana". bookdepository.com. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  5. ^ "When No-One's Looking Zana Fraillon". bookdepository.com. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  6. ^ "Monstrum House Bind Up by Z. Fraillon Hardie Grant Publishing". hardiegrant.com. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  7. ^ "No Stars to Wish on Zana Fraillon". allenandunwin.com. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d "Zana Fraillon Books Hachette Australia". hachette.com.au. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  9. ^ "2017 Archive ABIA". abiaawards.com.au. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  10. ^ "Blog Zana Fraillon Wins the 2017 Readings Young". readings.com.au. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  11. ^ "IBBY Honour List 2018". ibby.org. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  12. ^ "CBCA Shortlist 2017". cbca.org.au. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  13. ^ a b "Winners and shortlist Office of the Arts". arts.gov.au. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  14. ^ "2017 Shortlist Resources the CILIP Carnegie". carnegiegreenaway.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  15. ^ "Victorian Premier's Literary Awards 2017". wheelercentre.com. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  16. ^ "Outstanding writers recognised as finalists in literary awards". statements.qld.gov.au. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  17. ^ "Guardian Children's fiction prize 2016 shortlist". theguardian.com. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  18. ^ "2017 Shortlist The Inky Awards Blog". inkyawardsblog.insideadog.com.au. Retrieved 11 November 2020.
  19. ^ "Ethel Turner Prize for Young People's Literature". sl.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  20. ^ "CBCA Notables 2018". cbca.org.au. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  21. ^ "Australians Nominated for the 2018 Carnegie". booksandpublishing.com.au. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  22. ^ "Archive: 2018 Awards Crimefest". crimefest.com. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  23. ^ "Longlists for 2020 CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway". carnegiegreenaway.org.uk. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  24. ^ "CILIP Carnegie Medal Nominated Title 2021". carnegiegreenaway.org.uk. Retrieved 11 November 2020.