Zayd ibn al-Khattab

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Zayd ibn al-Khaṭṭāb (died 632) was a companion of the Islamic prophet Muḥammad and a brother of Umar the second Caliph.

Biography[edit]

He was the son of al-Khattab ibn Nufayl, a member of the Adi clan of the Quraysh tribe in Mecca, and of Asma bint Wahb of the Asad tribe.[1] He was older than his brother Umar.[1][2] He is described as "a very tall dark man".[1]

He became a Muslim before August 616.[1][2] He joined the general emigration to Medina in 622 and was made the brother in Islam of Maan ibn Adi.[1]

His marriage to his cousin, Atiqa bint Zayd, was childless and ended in divorce.[3] In Medina he married two women from the Amr clan of the Aws tribe. One was Habiba bint Abi Amir, who bore him a daughter, Asma;[1][4]:235 Habiba's niece Jamila was briefly married to Zayd's brother Umar.[4]:236 The other was Lubaba, a daughter of Abu Lubaba ibn Abd al-Mundhir, who was the mother of his son Abdulrahman.[1][4]:236

He fought at the Battle of Badr, the Battle of Uhud, the Battle of the Ditch and "all the battles with Allah's Messenger".[1] At Uhud Umar urged Zayd to borrow his armour. Zayd put it on but then he took it off again, saying, "I want what you want for yourself."[5]

At the Battle of Yamama in December 632, Zayd carried the Muslims' standard.[1][2] When Muslim baggage was exposed to plunder by the enemy, Zayd said, "As for the baggage, there is no baggage! As for the men, there are no men!" Then he shouted, "O Allah, I apologise for the flight of my companions! I am not guilty before Thee of what Musaylimah and Muhakkam have done!"[6] Zayd continued to hold the standard while fighting with his sword and he did not drop it until he was killed.[6][2] His killer was Abu Maryam al-Hanafi, who claimed: "Allah honoured him at my hand and did not weaken me at his hand."[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr, p. 294. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  2. ^ a b c d Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Landau-Tasseron, E. (1998). Volume 39: Biographies of the Prophet's Companions and Their Successors, p. 117.
  3. ^ Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani. Al-Isaba fi tamyiz al-Sahaba vol. 8 #11448.
  4. ^ a b c Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir. Translated by Bewley, A. (1995). The Women of Madina. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  5. ^ Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr, p. 296. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  6. ^ a b c Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr, p. 295. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.