Zen 2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

AMD Zen 2
AMD Zen 2 logo.png
General information
Launched7 July 2019; 3 years ago (7 July 2019)[1]
Designed byAMD
Common manufacturer(s)
Cache
L1 cache64 KB per core
L2 cache512 KB per core
Architecture and classification
Technology nodeTSMC 7 nm[2][3]
TSMC 6 nm[4]
Instruction setAMD64 (x86_64)
Physical specifications
Cores
  • Up to 64
Socket(s)
Products, models, variants
Product code name(s)
  • Matisse (desktop)
  • Rome (server)[3]
  • Castle Peak (HEDT)
  • Renoir (Desktop APU, mobile and embedded)
  • Mendocino (mobile and embedded refresh)
History
PredecessorZen+
SuccessorZen 3

Zen 2 is a computer processor microarchitecture by AMD. It is the successor of AMD's Zen and Zen+ microarchitectures, and is fabricated on the 7 nanometer MOSFET node from TSMC. The microarchitecture powers the third generation of Ryzen processors, known as Ryzen 3000 for the mainstream desktop chips (codename "Matisse"), Ryzen 4000U/H (codename "Renoir") and Ryzen 5000U (codename "Lucienne") for mobile applications, as Threadripper 3000 for high-end desktop systems,[5][6] and as Ryzen 4000G for accelerated processing units (APUs). The Ryzen 3000 series CPUs were released on 7 July 2019,[7][8] while the Zen 2-based Epyc server CPUs (codename "Rome") were released on 7 August 2019.[9] An additional chip, the Ryzen 9 3950X, was released in November 2019.[7]

At CES 2019, AMD showed a Ryzen third-generation engineering sample that contained one chiplet with eight cores and 16 threads.[5] AMD CEO Lisa Su also said to expect more than eight cores in the final lineup.[10] At Computex 2019, AMD revealed that the Zen 2 "Matisse" processors would feature up to 12 cores, and a few weeks later a 16 core processor was also revealed at E3 2019, being the aforementioned Ryzen 9 3950X.[11][12]

Zen 2 includes hardware mitigations to the Spectre security vulnerability.[13] Zen 2-based EPYC server CPUs use a design in which multiple CPU dies (up to eight in total) manufactured on a 7 nm process ("chiplets") are combined with a 14 nm I/O die on each multi-chip module (MCM) package. Using this, up to 64 physical cores and 128 total compute threads (with simultaneous multithreading) are supported per socket. This architecture is nearly identical to the layout of the "pro-consumer" flagship processor Threadripper 3990X.[14] Zen 2 delivers about 15% more instructions per clock than Zen and Zen+,[15][16] the 14- and 12-nm microarchitectures utilized on first and second generation Ryzen respectively.

Both the PlayStation 5 and the Xbox Series X and Series S use chips based on the Zen 2 microarchitecture, with proprietary tweaks and different configurations in each system's implementation than AMD sells in its own commercially available APUs.[17][18]

Design[edit]

Two delidded Zen 2 processors designed with the multi-chip module approach. The CPU on the left/top (used for mainstream Ryzen CPUs) uses a smaller, less capable I/O die and up to two CCDs (only one is used on this particular example), while the one on the right/bottom (used for high-end desktop, HEDT, Ryzen Threadripper and server Epyc CPUs) uses a larger, more capable I/O die and up to eight CCDs.

Zen 2 is a significant departure from the physical design paradigm of AMD's previous Zen architectures, Zen and Zen+. Zen 2 moves to a multi-chip module design where the I/O components of the CPU are laid out on its own, separate die, which is also called a chiplet in this context. This separation has benefits in scalability and manufacturability. As physical interfaces don't scale very well with shrinks in process technology, their separation into a different die allows these components to be manufactured using a larger, more mature process node than the CPU dies. The CPU dies (referred to by AMD as core complex dies or CCDs), now more compact due to the move of I/O components onto another die, can be manufactured using a smaller process with fewer manufacturing defects than a larger die would exhibit (since the chances of a die having a defect increases with device (die) size) while also allowing for more dies per wafer. In addition, the central I/O die can service multiple chiplets, making it easier to construct processors with a large number of cores.[14][19][20]

Simplified illustration of the Zen 2 microarchitecture
On the left (top on mobile): Die shot of a Zen 2 Core Complex Die. On the right (bottom): Die shot of a Zen 2 EPYC I/O die.

With Zen 2, each CPU chiplet houses 8 CPU cores, arranged in 2 core complexes (CCXs), each of 4 CPU cores. These chiplets are manufactured using TSMC's 7 nanometer MOSFET node and are about 74 to 80 mm2 in size.[19] The chiplet has about 3.8 billion transistors, while the 12 nm I/O die (IOD) is ~125 mm2 and has 2.09 billion transistors.[21] The amount of L3 cache has been doubled to 32 MB, with each CCX in the chiplet now having access to 16 MB of L3 compared to the 8 MB of Zen and Zen+.[22] AVX2 performance is greatly improved by an increase in execution unit width from 128-bit to 256-bit.[23] There are multiple variants of the I/O die: one manufactured on GlobalFoundries 14 nanometer process, and another manufactured using the same company's 12 nanometer process. The 14 nanometer dies have more features and are used for the EPYC Rome processors, whereas the 12 nm versions are used for consumer processors.[19] Both processes have similar feature sizes, so their transistor density is also similar.[24]

AMD's Zen 2 architecture can deliver higher performance at a lower power consumption than Intel's Cascade Lake architecture, with an example being the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X running with a TDP of 140 W in ECO mode delivering higher performance than the Intel Core i9-10980XE running with a TDP of 165 W.[25]

New features[edit]

  • Some new instruction set extensions: WBNOINVD, CLWB, RDPID, RDPRU, MCOMMIT. Each instruction uses its own CPUID bit.[26][27]
  • Hardware mitigations against the Spectre V4 speculative store bypass vulnerability.[28]
  • Zero-latency memory mirroring optimization (undocumented).[29]

Feature tables[edit]

CPUs[edit]

CPU features table

APUs[edit]

APU features table

Products[edit]

On 26 May 2019, AMD announced six Zen 2-based desktop Ryzen processors (codenamed "Matisse"). These included 6-core and 8-core variants in the Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 product lines, as well as a new Ryzen 9 line that includes the company's first 12-core and 16-core mainstream desktop processors. [30]

The Matisse I/O die is also used as the X570 chipset.

AMD's second generation of Epyc processors, codenamed "Rome", feature up to 64 cores, and were launched on 7 August 2019.[9]

Desktop CPUs[edit]

3000 series (Matisse)[edit]

Model Release date
and price
Fab Chiplets Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket PCIe lanes[ii][iii] Memory
support
TDP
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Entry-level
Ryzen 3 3100[31] April 21, 2020
$99
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/OD
4 (8) 2 × 2 3.6 3.9 256 KB 2 MB 16 MB AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 4.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 3 3300X[32] April 21, 2020
$120
1 × 4 3.8 4.3
Mainstream
Ryzen 5 3500 November 15, 2019
OEM (West)
Japan ¥16000[33]
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/OD
6 (6) 2 × 3 3.6 4.1 384 KB 3 MB 32 MB AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 4.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5 3500X[34] October 8, 2019
China ¥1099
32 MB
16 MB per CCX
Ryzen 5 3600[35] July 7, 2019
US $199
6 (12) 3.6 4.2
Ryzen 5 Pro 3600[36] September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 5 3600X[37] July 7, 2019
US $249
3.8 4.4 95 W
Ryzen 5 3600XT[38] July 7, 2020
US $249
4.5
Performance
Ryzen 7 Pro 3700[39] September 30, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
1 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.6 4.4 512 KB 4 MB 32 MB AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 4.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
065 W
[iv]
Ryzen 7 3700X[41] July 7, 2019
US $329
Ryzen 7 3800X[42] July 7, 2019
US $399
3.9 4.5 105 W
Ryzen 7 3800XT[43] July 7, 2020
US $399
4.7
Enthusiast
Ryzen 9 3900[44] October 8, 2019
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/OD
12 (24) 4 × 3 3.1 4.3 768 KB 6 MB 64 MB AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 4.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 9 Pro 3900[45] September 30, 2019
OEM
Ryzen 9 3900X[46] July 7, 2019
US $499
3.8 4.6 105 W
[v]
Ryzen 9 3900XT[47] July 7, 2020
US $499
4.7
Ryzen 9 3950X[48] November 25, 2019
US $749
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.5 1 MB 8 MB
High-End Desktop (HEDT)
Ryzen Threadripper 3960X[49] November 25, 2019
US $1399
TSMC
7FF
4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
24 (48) 8 × 3 3.8 4.5 1.5 MB 12 MB 128 MB sTRX4 64 (56+8)
PCIe 4.0
DDR4-3200
quad-channel
280 W
[vi]
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X[51] November 25, 2019
US $1999
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.7 4.5 2 MB 16 MB
Ryzen Threadripper 3990X[52] February 7, 2020
US $3990
8 × CCD
1 × I/OD
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.9 4.3 4 MB 32 MB 256 MB
Workstation
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3945WX[53] July 14, 2020
OEM
TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/OD
12 (24) 4 × 3 4.0 4.3 768 KB 6 MB 64 MB sWRX8 128 (120+8)
PCIe 4.0
DDR4-3200
octa-channel
280 W
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3955WX[54] July 14, 2020
OEM
16 (32) 4 × 4 3.9 1 MB 8 MB
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX[55] July 14, 2020
OEM
4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
32 (64) 8 × 4 3.5 4.2 2 MB 16 MB 128 MB
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3995WX[56] July 14, 2020
OEM
8 × CCD
1 × I/OD
64 (128) 16 × 4 2.7 4.2 4 MB 32 MB 256 MB
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ User accessible+Chipset link
  3. ^ The chipset itself provides additional user-accessible PCIe lanes and integrated PCIe devices, see AM4 chipsets.
  4. ^ Ryzen 7 3700X may consume over 90 W under load.[40]
  5. ^ Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X may consume over 145 W under load.[40]
  6. ^ Ryzen Threadripper 3990X may consume over 490 W under load.[50]


4000 series (Renoir)[edit]

Based on the Ryzen 4000G series APUs which had the integrated graphics disabled.

Model Release date
and price
Fab Cores (threads) Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket PCIe lanes[ii] Memory support TDP
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3
Ryzen 3 4100[57] April 4, 2022
US $99
TSMC
N7FF
4 (8) 1 × 4 3.8 4.0 256 KB 2 MB 4 MB AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
Ryzen 5
Ryzen 5 4500[58] April 4, 2022
US $129
TSMC
N7FF
6 (12) 1 × 6 3.6 4.1 384 KB 3 MB 8 MB AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
65 W
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ User accessible+Chipset link


Desktop APUs[edit]

Model Release date
and price
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe lanes Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Core Config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Architecture Config[ii] Clock Processing
power[iii]
(GFLOPS)
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 4300GE[note 1] July 21, 2020
(OEM only)
TSMC
7nm FinFET
4 (8) 1 × 4 3.5 4.0 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB GCN 5th gen 384:24:12
6 CU
1700 MHz 1305.6 AM4 24 (20+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200
dual-channel
35 W
Ryzen 3 4300G[note 1] 3.8 65 W
Ryzen 5 4600GE[note 1] 6 (12) 2 × 3 3.3 4.2 8 MB 448:28:14
7 CU
1900 MHz 1702.4 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600G[note 1][59] April 4, 2022
US $154
3.7 65 W
Ryzen 7 4700GE[note 1] July 21, 2020
(OEM only)
8 (16) 2 × 4 3.1 4.3 512:32:16
8 CU
2000 MHz 2048 35 W
Ryzen 7 4700G[note 1] 3.6 4.4 2100 MHz 2150.4 65 W
  1. ^ Core complexes (CCXs) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  3. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.
  1. ^ a b c d e f Model also available as PRO version (4350GE, 4350G, 4650GE, 4650G, 4750GE, 4750G), released 21. July 2020 for OEM only.


Mobile processors[edit]

Renoir (4000 series)[edit]

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe
lanes
Memory support TDP
Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Archi-
tecture
Config[ii] Clock Processing
power
(GFLOPS)[iii]
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 4300U[note 1][60][61] March 16, 2020 TSMC
7FF
4 (4) 1 × 4 2.7 3.7 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB GCN
5th gen
320:20:8
5 CU
1400 MHz 896 FP6 16 (8+4+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 5 4500U[62][63] 6 (6) 2 × 3 2.3 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152
Ryzen 5 4600U[note 1][64] 6 (12) 2.1
Ryzen 5 4680U[65] April 13, 2021 448:28:8
7 CU
1344
Ryzen 5 4600HS[66] March 16, 2020 3.0 384:24:8
6 CU
1152 35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H[67][68] 35–54 W
Ryzen 7 4700U[note 1][69] 8 (8) 2 × 4 2.0 4.1 448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 10–25 W
Ryzen 7 4800U[70] 8 (16) 1.8 4.2 512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792
Ryzen 7 4980U[71] April 13, 2021 2.0 4.4 1950 MHz 1996.8
Ryzen 7 4800HS[72] March 16, 2020 2.9 4.2 448:28:8
7 CU
1600 MHz 1433.6 35 W
Ryzen 7 4800H[73][74] 35–54 W
Ryzen 9 4900HS[75] 3 4.3 512:32:8
8 CU
1750 MHz 1792 35 W
Ryzen 9 4900H[76] 3.3 4.4 35–54 W
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Unified shaders : texture mapping units : render output units and compute units (CU)
  3. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.
  1. ^ a b c Model also available as PRO version as 4450U[77], 4650U[78], 4750U[79], released May 7, 2020.


Lucienne (5000 series)[edit]

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe
support
Memory support TDP
Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Architecture Config[ii] Clock Processing
power[iii]
(GFLOPS)
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
Ryzen 3 5300U[80] January 12, 2021 TSMC
7FF
4 (8) 1 × 4 2.6 3.8 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
4 MB GCN 5th gen 384:24:8
6 CU
1500 MHz 1152 FP6 16 (8+4+4)
PCIe 3.0
DDR4-3200
LPDDR4-4266
dual-channel
10–25 W
Ryzen 5 5500U[81][82] 6 (12) 2 × 3 2.1 4.0 8 MB
4 MB per CCX
448:28:8
7 CU
1800 MHz 1612.8
Ryzen 7 5700U[83] 8 (16) 2 × 4 1.8 4.3 512:32:8
8 CU
1900 MHz 1945.6
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX
  2. ^ Unified shaders : texture mapping units : render output units and compute units (CU)
  3. ^ Single precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Embedded processors[edit]

Model Release
date
Fab CPU GPU Socket PCIe
support
Memory
support
TDP
Cores
(threads)
Clock rate (GHz) Cache Archi-
tecture
Config[i] Clock
(GHz)
Processing
power[ii]
(GFLOPS)
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
V2516[84][85] November 10, 2020[86] TSMC
7FF
6 (12) 2.1 3.95 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
8 MB GCN 5th gen 384:24:8
6 CU
1.5 1152 FP6 PCIe 3.0 ×20
8+4+4+4
DDR4-3200
dual-channel

LPDDR4X-4266
quad-channel
10-25 W
V2546[84][85] 3.0 3.95 35-54 W
V2718[84][85] 8 (16) 1.7 4.15 448:28:8
7 CU
1.6 1433.6 10-25 W
V2748[84][85] 2.9 4.25 35-54 W
  1. ^ Unified Shaders : Texture Mapping Units : Render Output Units and Compute Units (CU)
  2. ^ Single-precision performance is calculated from the base (or boost) core clock speed based on a FMA operation.


Server processors[edit]

Common features of these CPUs:

  • Codenamed "Rome"
  • Zen 2 Microarchitecture
  • 7 nm TSMC Process
  • SP3 Socket
  • The number of PCI-E lanes: 128
  • Release date: August 7, 2019 except EPYC 7H12 which was released on September 18, 2019
  • Memory support: eight-channel DDR4-3200
Model Price Fab Chiplets Cores
(threads)
Core config[i] Clock rate (GHz) Cache Socket &
configuration
TDP
Base Boost L1 L2 L3
EPYC 7232P US $450 TSMC
7FF
2 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 (16) 4 × 2 3.1 3.2 32 KB inst.
32 KB data
per core
512 KB
per core
32 MB
8 MB per CCX
SP3
1P
120 W
EPYC 7302P US $825 4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
16 (32) 8 × 2 3 3.3 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
155 W
EPYC 7402P US $1250 24 (48) 8 × 3 2.8 3.35 180 W
EPYC 7502P US $2300 32 (64) 8 × 4 2.5 3.35
EPYC 7702P US $4425 8 × CCD
1 × I/OD
64 (128) 16 × 4 2 3.35 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7252 US $475 2 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 (16) 4 × 2 3.1 3.2 64 MB
16 MB per CCX
SP3
2P
120 W
EPYC 7262 US $575 4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 × 1 3.2 3.4 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
155 W
EPYC 7272 US $625 2 × CCD
1 × I/OD
12 (24) 4 × 3 2.9 3.2 64 MB
16 MB per CCX
120 W
EPYC 7282 US $650 16 (32) 4 × 4 2.8 3.2
EPYC 7302 US $978 4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 × 2 3 3.3 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
155 W
EPYC 7352 US $1350 24 (48) 8 × 3 2.3 3.2
EPYC 7402 US $1783 8 × 3 2.8 3.35 180 W
EPYC 7452 US $2025 32 (64) 8 × 4 2.35 3.35 155 W
EPYC 7502 US $2600 8 × 4 2.5 3.35 180 W
EPYC 7532 US $3350 8 × CCD
1 × I/OD
16 × 2 2.4 3.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7542 US $3400 4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 × 4 2.9 3.4 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
225 W
EPYC 7552 US $4025 6 × CCD
1 × I/OD
48 (96) 12 × 4 2.2 3.3 192 MB
16 MB per CCX
200 W
EPYC 7642 US $4775 8 × CCD
1 × I/OD
16 × 3 2.3 3.3 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
225 W
EPYC 7662 US $6150 64 (128) 16 × 4 2 3.3 225 W
EPYC 7702 US $6450 2 3.35 200 W
EPYC 7742 US $6950 2.25 3.4 225 W
EPYC 7H12 2.6 3.3 280 W
EPYC 7F32 US $2100 4 × CCD
1 × I/OD
8 (16) 8 × 1 3.7 3.9 128 MB
16 MB per CCX
180 W
EPYC 7F52 US $3100 8 × CCD
1 × I/OD
16 (32) 16 × 1 3.5 3.9 256 MB
16 MB per CCX
240 W
EPYC 7F72 US $2450 6 × CCD
1 × I/OD
24 (48) 12 × 2 3.2 3.7 192 MB
16 MB per CCX
240 W
  1. ^ Core Complexes (CCX) × cores per CCX


Video game consoles and other embedded[edit]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AMD Unleashes Ultimate PC Gaming Platform with Worldwide Availability of AMD Radeon RX 5700 Series Graphics Cards and AMD Ryzen 3000 Series Desktop Processors" (Press release). Santa Clara, California: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. 7 July 2019. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  2. ^ Larabel, Michael (16 May 2017). "AMD Talks Up Vega Frontier Edition, Epyc, Zen 2, ThreadRipper". Phoronix. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  3. ^ a b Cutress, Ian (20 June 2017). "AMD EPYC Launch Event Live Blog". AnandTech. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  4. ^ Boshor, Gavin (20 September 2022). "AMD Launches Mendocino APUs: Zen 2-based Ryzen and Athlon 7020 Series with RDNA 2 Graphics". AnandTech. Retrieved 26 September 2022.
  5. ^ a b Cutress, Ian (9 January 2019). "AMD Ryzen third Gen 'Matisse' Coming Mid 2019: Eight Core Zen 2 with PCIe 4.0 on Desktop". AnandTech. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  6. ^ online, heise. "AMD Ryzen 3000: 12-Kernprozessoren für den Mainstream". c't Magazin.
  7. ^ a b Leather, Antony. "AMD Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 7 3700X Review: Old Ryzen Owners Look Away Now". Forbes. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  8. ^ "AMD Ryzen 3000 CPUs launching July 7 with up to 12 cores". PCGamesN. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  9. ^ a b "2nd Gen AMD EPYC Processors Set New Standard for the Modern Datacenter with Record-Breaking Performance and Significant TCO Savings". AMD. 7 August 2019. Retrieved 8 August 2019.
  10. ^ Hachman, Mark (9 January 2019). "AMD's CEO Lisa Su confirms ray tracing GPU development, hints at more 3rd-gen Ryzen cores". Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  11. ^ Curtress, Ian (26 May 2019). "AMD Ryzen 3000 Announced: Five CPUs, 12 Cores for $499, Up to 4.6 GHz, PCIe 4.0, Coming 7/7". Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  12. ^ Thomas, Bill (10 June 2019). "AMD announces the Ryzen 9 3950X, a 16-core mainstream processor". Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  13. ^ Alcorn, Paul (31 January 2018). "AMD Predicts Double-Digit Revenue Growth In 2018, Ramps Up GPU Production". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved 31 January 2018.
  14. ^ a b Shilov, Anton (6 November 2018). "AMD Unveils 'Chiplet' Design Approach: 7nm Zen 2 Cores Meet 14 nm I/O Die".
  15. ^ Cutress, Ian. "AMD Zen 2 Microarchitecture Analysis: Ryzen 3000 and EPYC Rome". www.anandtech.com.
  16. ^ Walton, Steven (16 November 2020). "AMD Ryzen 5000 IPC Performance Tested". TechSpot. Retrieved 18 April 2021.
  17. ^ Warren, Tom (24 February 2020). "Microsoft reveals more Xbox Series X specs, confirms 12 teraflops GPU". The Verge. Retrieved 24 February 2020.
  18. ^ Leadbetter, Richard (18 March 2020). "Inside PlayStation 5: the specs and the tech that deliver Sony's next-gen vision". Eurogamer. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  19. ^ a b c Cutress, Ian (10 June 2019). "AMD Zen 2 Microarchitecture Analysis: Ryzen 3000 and EPYC Rome". AnandTech. p. 1. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  20. ^ De Gelas, Johan (7 August 2019). "AMD Rome Second Generation EPYC Review: 2x 64-core Benchmarked". AnandTech. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  21. ^ November 2019, Paul Alcorn 21 (21 November 2019). "AMD Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 7 3700X Review: Zen 2 and 7nm Unleashed". Tom's Hardware.
  22. ^ Cutress, Ian (10 June 2019). "AMD Zen 2 Microarchitecture Analysis: Ryzen 3000 and EPYC Rome". AnandTech. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  23. ^ Cutress, Ian (10 June 2019). "AMD Zen 2 Microarchitecture Analysis: Ryzen 3000 and EPYC Rome". AnandTech. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  24. ^ Schor, David (22 July 2018). "VLSI 2018: GlobalFoundries 12nm Leading-Performance, 12LP".
  25. ^ Mujtaba, Hassan (24 December 2019). "AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X Is An Absolutely Efficient Monster CPU".
  26. ^ "AMD Zen 2 CPUs Come With A Few New Instructions - At Least WBNOINVD, CLWB, RDPID - Phoronix". www.phoronix.com.
  27. ^ "GNU Binutils Adds Bits For AMD Zen 2's RDPRU + MCOMMIT Instructions - Phoronix". www.phoronix.com.
  28. ^ btarunr (12 June 2019). "AMD Zen 2 has Hardware Mitigation for Spectre V4". TechPowerUp. Retrieved 18 October 2019.
  29. ^ Agner, Fog. "Surprising new feature in AMD Ryzen 3000". Agner's CPU blog.
  30. ^ Cutress, Ian (26 May 2019). "AMD Ryzen 3000 Announced: Five CPUs, 12 Cores for $499, Up to 4.6 GHz, PCIe 4.0, Coming 7/7". AnandTech. Retrieved 17 June 2019.
  31. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 3 3100 Desktop Processor". AMD.
  32. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 3 3300X Desktop Processor". AMD.
  33. ^ "AMD Launches Ryzen 5 3500 in Japan with 6 Cores/6 Threads for 16K Yen". Hardware Times. 17 February 2020.
  34. ^ Cutress, Ian (8 October 2019). "AMD Brings Ryzen 9 3900 and Ryzen 5 3500X To Life". AnandTech.
  35. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 5 3600 Desktop Processor". AMD.
  36. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 3600 Processor". AMD.
  37. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 5 3600X Processor". AMD.
  38. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 5 3600XT". AMD.
  39. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 3700 Processor". AMD.
  40. ^ a b Alcorn, Paul (14 November 2019). "Tom's Hardware Ryzen 9 3950X review". Tom's Hardware. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  41. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 7 3700X". AMD.
  42. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 7 3800X". AMD.
  43. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 7 3800XT". AMD.
  44. ^ "AMD Ryzen 9 3900 specifications". CPU World.
  45. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 9 PRO 3900 Processor". AMD.
  46. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 9 3900X Processor". AMD.
  47. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 9 3900XT Processor". AMD.
  48. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 9 3950X Processor". AMD.
  49. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3960X Processor". AMD.
  50. ^ Hill, Luke (7 February 2020). "Kitguru AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X CPU Review". KitGuru. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  51. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X Processor". AMD.
  52. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X Processor". AMD.
  53. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3945WX". AMD.
  54. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3955WX". AMD.
  55. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3975WX". AMD.
  56. ^ "AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3995WX". AMD.
  57. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 3 4100". AMD.
  58. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 5 4500". AMD.
  59. ^ "AMD Ryzen™ 5 4600G". AMD.
  60. ^ "AMD Ryzen 3 4300U". AMD.
  61. ^ "AMD Ryzen 3 4300U Specs". TechPowerUp. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  62. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 4500U". AMD.
  63. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 4500U Specs". TechPowerUp. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  64. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 4600U". AMD.
  65. ^ CoveMiner. "Surface Laptop 4 processors technical overview - Surface". docs.microsoft.com. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  66. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 4600HS". AMD.
  67. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 4600H". AMD.
  68. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 4600H Specs". TechPowerUp. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  69. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 4700U". AMD.
  70. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 4800U". AMD.
  71. ^ CoveMiner. "Surface Laptop 4 processors technical overview - Surface". docs.microsoft.com. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  72. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 4800HS". AMD.
  73. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 4800H". AMD.
  74. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 4800H Specs". TechPowerUp. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  75. ^ "AMD Ryzen 9 4900HS". AMD.
  76. ^ "AMD Ryzen 9 4900H". AMD.
  77. ^ "AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 4450U". AMD.
  78. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 4650U". AMD.
  79. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U". AMD.
  80. ^ "AMD Ryzen 3 5300U". AMD.
  81. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 5500U". AMD.
  82. ^ "AMD Ryzen 5 5500U Specs". TechPowerUp. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  83. ^ "AMD Ryzen 7 5700U". AMD.
  84. ^ a b c d "Embedded Processor Specifications". AMD.
  85. ^ a b c d "Product Brief: AMD Ryzen Embedded V2000 Processor Family" (PDF).{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  86. ^ "AMD Unveils AMD Ryzen Embedded V2000 Processors with Enhanced Performance and Power Efficiency". AMD.
  87. ^ "AMD 4700S 8-Core Processor Desktop Kit". AMD. Retrieved 26 September 2022.