Zenair CH 300

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Tri-Z CH 300
ZenairCH-300TriZenithC-GOVK.jpg
Zenair CH 300 flown by "Red" Morris in the Canada Aviation and Space Museum
Role Homebuilt light aircraft
National origin Canada
Manufacturer Zenair
Designer Chris Heintz
First flight 9 July 1977
Variants AMD Alarus

The Zenair Tri-Z CH 300 is a three-seat Canadian homebuilt light aircraft. A single-engined low-winged monoplane, the CH 300 first flew in 1977, with several hundred kits sold.

Development and design[edit]

CH 300 on floats
CH 300 TD "taildragger" variant

The CH 300 is an enlarged three-seat derivative of the Zenair Zenith CH 200, designed by Chris Heintz in the mid 1970s as the Tri-Zénith.[1] Like the CH 200, it is a low-winged monoplane of all-metal construction with a fixed nosewheel undercarriage, but is larger and more powerful, and is fitted with a rear bench seat capable of accommodating a third adult or two children, and is fitted with a forward sliding canopy. It is designed to be powered by an engine giving between 125 and 180 hp (93 and 134 kW).[2][3]

The first example made its maiden flight on 9 July 1977, with over 400 sets of plans sold by 1982.[2] One CH 300, modified with extra fuel tanks and piloted by Robin "Red" Morris, made a non-stop trans-Canada flight between Vancouver International Airport and Halifax International Airport on 1–2 July 1978, covering the 2,759 mile (4,440 km) in 22 hours, 44 mins, setting three FAI Class C-1c point-to-point speed records.[2][3][4]

Plans for the CH 300 remained on sale in 1999.[5] The Zenair CH 300 formed the basis for the factory built Zenair CH-2000, which first flew in 1993.[5][6]

Variants[edit]

CH 300
Basic model with tricycle landing gear
CH 300 TD
"Taildragger" model with conventional landing gear

Aircraft on display[edit]

Specifications (150 hp O-320 engine)[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1982-83[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 2 passengers
  • Length: 22 ft 6 in (6.85 m)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 7 in (8.10 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
  • Wing area: 129.2 sq ft (12.00 m2)
  • Aspect ratio: 5.48:1
  • Empty weight: 1,100 lb (499 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,850 lb (839 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-320 air-cooled flat-four, 150 hp (110 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 160 mph (260 km/h, 140 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 143 mph (230 km/h, 124 kn) (75% power)
  • Stall speed: 53 mph (85 km/h, 46 kn) (flaps down)
  • Range: 530 mi (850 km, 460 nmi)
  • Rate of climb: 1,000 ft/min (5.1 m/s)

See also[edit]

Related development

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Taylor 1976, p.458.
  2. ^ a b c d Taylor 1982, p.495.
  3. ^ a b Zenair, Zenair pamphlet, circa 1986.
  4. ^ "List of records established by the 'Zenair Tri-Z'[permanent dead link]". Fédération Aéronautique Internationale. Retrieved 27 February 2010.
  5. ^ a b Taylor 1999, p.535.
  6. ^ Taylor 1999, p.401.
  7. ^ Canada Aviation and Space Museum (n.d.). "Zenair CH-300 Tri-Z". Retrieved 9 June 2012.

References[edit]