Zenopolis (Isauria)

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Zenopolis (Ancient Greek: Ζηνούπολις) was an ancient Roman and Byzantine city in Isauria. Its site is located near Elmayurdu in Asiatic Turkey.[1]

History[edit]

This city was the birthplace of Emperor Zeno (474–491), and was renamed in his honour.[2] Its previous name was Rusumblada, according to Ramsay, but the author of the entry on Rusumblada in Paulys Real-Encyclopaedie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft considers this uncertain.[3] Its modern name is Isnebol.[4] George of Cyprus mentioned it in the 7th century, as did Constantine Porphyrogenitus in the 10th century, as a city of the Isaurian Decapolis.[5]

Bishopric[edit]

The city is recorded as a bishopric in the 6th-century Notitia Episcopatuum of the Patriarchate of Antioch,[6] but in about 732 Isauria was attached to the Patriarchate of Constantinople.[5]

Le Quien mentions two bishops:[7]

The Catholic Church's list of titular sees continues to include the see as Zenopolis in Isauria.[8] Past titular Bishops include:

  • Luke Wadding (26 Aug 1671 Appointed - 23 Aug 1678)
  • Luigi Moccagatta, (3 Mar 1844 Appointed - 6 Sep 1891)
  • Francesco Albino Symon (17 Dec 1891 Appointed - 2 Aug 1897)
  • Engelberto Voršak (24 Mar 1898 Appointed - 22 Aug 1921)
  • Stefan Walczykiewicz (20 Jul 1928 Appointed - 12 May 1940)
  • Jean-Baptiste Castanier,(29 Nov 1940 Appointed - 12 Mar 1943)
  • Anton Scharnagl (10 Apr 1943 Appointed - 19 Jan 1955)
  • Jacques Henri Romeijn,(10 Jul 1955 Appointed - 3 Jan 1961)
  • Giovanni Ferrofino (28 Oct 1961 Appointed - 20 Dec 2010)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.
  2. ^ Stephen Mitchell, A history of the later Roman Empire, AD 284–641: the transformation of the ancient world, Wiley-Blackwell, 2007, ISBN 1-4051-0856-8, p. 114.
  3. ^ August Friedrich von Pauly, Georg Wissowa, Wilhelm Kroll, Kurt Witte (editors), Paulys Real-Encyclopaedie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft (J. B. Metzler, 1914), 2. Reihe, p. 1238
  4. ^ William Mitchell Ramsay, Asia Minor, 365
  5. ^ a b Siméon Vailhé, "Zenonopolis" in Catholic Encyclopedia (New York 1912)
  6. ^ Échos d'Orient, X., 145, cited by Siméon Vailhé
  7. ^ Michel Lequien, Oriens christianus in quatuor Patriarchatus digestus (Paris 1740, Tomus II, coll. 1033-1034
  8. ^ Annuario Pontificio 2013 (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2013, ISBN 978-88-209-9070-1), p. 1012

Coordinates: 36°41′59″N 32°41′26″E / 36.699801°N 32.690517°E / 36.699801; 32.690517