Zentralstadion (1956)

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Zentralstadion
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-1987-0801-101, Leipzig, Zentralstadion, Sportfest.jpg
Full name Zentralstadion
Former names Frankfurter Wiesen
Stadion der Hunderttausend
Sportforum Leipzig[1]
Location Leipzig, Germany
Coordinates 51°20′44.86″N 12°20′53.59″E / 51.3457944°N 12.3482194°E / 51.3457944; 12.3482194Coordinates: 51°20′44.86″N 12°20′53.59″E / 51.3457944°N 12.3482194°E / 51.3457944; 12.3482194
Owner German Democratic Republic
Operator Leipzig
Capacity 120,000[2]
Construction
Built 4 March 1955; 60 years ago (1955-03-04)
Opened 4 August 1956; 58 years ago (1956-08-04)
Renovated 2004 as Red Bull Arena (Leipzig)
Closed 2000
Demolished seats, fences and floodlights only
Construction cost 9mio USD
Architect Werner March (sketch), Eitel Jackowski (complete), Heinz Schütze (complete),[3]Rudolf Lossner (buildings)[4]
Project manager Walter Ulbricht
Tenants
Deutscher Turn- und Sportbund
DHFK Leipzig
Trade Sports- Associations of sports societies in the GDR

Central Stadium (German: Zentralstadion, German pronunciation: [tsɛnˈtra:lˈʃta:di̯ɔn]) was a multi-use stadium in Leipzig, Germany. It was initially used as the stadium of 1. FC Lokomotive Leipzig matches. In 2004, it was renovated into the current Zentralstadion. The capacity of the stadium was 120,000 spectators. The stands were built of the 1,5 million Cubic metre debris of Bombing of Leipzig in World War II. The name came after the Soviet society which was using the term Central Stadium for their stadiums within the towns.

Final review[edit]

After the 1896 Summer Olympics, the city of Leipzig begun to plan a stadium in its town. The Zentralstadion was built first for the sports students within the Sportforum Leipzig, as stadium of 100,000. Beside it was the Olympic style swimming stadium. After the sports university, rowing channel and the swimming stadium, they began to plan for a new stadium downtown. The citizen s wanted to get the Olympic Games for Leipzig. They used the blueprints of the architect Werner March, the architect of the Olympiastadion (Berlin). To finish the plan, they needed only 15 months. The reason is that 180,000 volunteers worked there without salary. Walter Ulbricht himself named the stadium into "Stadion der Hunderttausend" (stadium of 100,000). He decided that the German Gym and Sports Celebrations must take place there only.[5][6][7][8][9] Willy Tröger was a disabled player who played with an amputated right arm and shot a final goal for the GDR national team, 1957.[10] First soccer teams from other cities and towns were the Honved Budapest and 1.FC Kaiserslautern. The next events with filled stadium is the Friedensfahrt. The state actor Uwe Steimle told:" It is not a noticeable society with power." The best club soccer event there was the won semifinal match of the 1986–87 European Cup Winners' Cup.[11] The only one match in Leipzig that soccer fans still know. Up to 1987, the stadium was still up to date. 1977 they got better flood lights with more lumens, but had the problem that the houses of beside the stadium had power cuts during matches. Peoples had no light in their flats (Leipzig Waldstraßen District). It is still the German stadium with the most spectators during a match. For matches of the GDR national team attendance is regularly 80,000 up to 120,000 spectators.

Architecture[edit]

Reasons for the new construction as part of the Sports Forum Leipzig[edit]

Since the War of the Fourth Coalition, pedagogues (Ernst Moritz Arndt & Friedrich Ludwig Jahn) became the idea to invent German national sports celebrations for defending as Lützow Free Corps against the French invaders.[12] Decades later: Leipzig was one of the richest towns in Germany. They had so many festivals for sports celebrated. Other towns in Germany tried or celebrated the same but had never over 100,000 or more participants, during the time of the Kingdom of Saxony, Weimar Republic and the Third Reich, except during the 1936 Summer Olympics. The leader Walter Ulbricht wanted to have own national games and that needs a Stadium which does commemorate for the 100,000 fallen soldiers during the Battle of Leipzig, for norms and principles of the First Geneva Convention (humanity law).[13] And Their motto was of course and after their anthem of East Germany Risen from Ruins.

Construction time[edit]

Workers are happy to have debris for their stadium: motivated, social, lack of food stuff and clothes

Heinz Haferkorn (regional leader of the Free German Youth) is the official in charge for the volunteers and got the order to find 200 volunteers, for every working day.[14] They begin their work on August 2, 1955. To save money, say use the ruins of the town. The official architect Karl Souradny was never the real and went only to parties and worked in East Berlin only. He had drawn only the survey map and that is all. Nevertheless he got for three GDR pojects the full salaries.[15] The all in all 180,000 volunteers working together 735,992 hours for the stadium, which needed for machines, concrete and tools 28 millions East German mark/ 5,6 million Deutsche Mark/ 2,9 million / 9 million $.[16] A small train had been brought nonstop debris to the stadium. They didn't throw this on walls but created a mixture with ash, soil with bricks and compressed it with water.[17]

Renovation controversies[edit]

1990, due riots in other countries of Europe and in Leipzig's Alfred-Kunze-Sportpark, the leader Rudolf Krause of the interior ministry in Leipzig ordered the ban of the Central Stadium. Rioters getting no real penalties when they can demolish in stadiums.[18] The bell may not toll and the flame never more ignited, of the Werner Seelenbinder Tower.[19] Initiators are the chancellor Gerhard Schröder, Otto Schily and Wolfgang Tiefensee. The Olympic Stadium, Berlin and the stadium here have a few similarities. Both had the same architects and had 100,000 seats. Both stadiums can be reached in nearly the same time with the public transportation systems and the highways. Than begun the time of differences: In Leipzig they did say it is too expensive to have this big stadium without roof. In Berlin they did say the stadium needs only new seats and a new roof. In Berlin they did say that they will get more spectators, after the renovation. In Leipzig with the one of the bet public infrastructure they said it would come less spectators. In Leipzig the renovation would be expensive for only the seats, fences and roof. In 2006 they got for the international matches over 70,000 ticket requests, during the Soccer World Cup. The new Red Bull Arena (Leipzig) costs more than the old stadium and has less spectators. Would they have more seats they would increase their financial earn. And they would get more spectators in Leipzig, due the ability to have other sport competitions and other soccer finals in this stadium. If they would really have too less spectators (which is nonsense), they had the chance to block the sections for only 40,000 seats and build the other 60,000 when they will need them. Finally they had a better stadium with character what is cheaper, when they had only bought a new roof and seats with fences. Anybody could come and say: your stadium is too small for our stars, teams competitions. Leipzig has enough hotels and many opportunities. It is not a hicksville. Finally the stadium can nevertheless being expanded again, up to 100,000 or even larger. On all sides can be attached/ reopened the old new extra stands which are more flatter, due the roof installation is anchored inside the outwards- wall. The old roof is part of the new and must be central located on all sides, with the new parts. A facade is needed and would create new rooms for the necessities. Hurdle is the Federal Ministry of the Interior in Germany which is practically trying to sabotage this project within of media, architects, building contractor, inventing of new laws to make all expensive and a lack of qualified personal. Motivation is a paranoia, that all in Eastern Germany must be worsen than in Western Germany. In addition it has approved that the stadium in side the Central- Stadium have been built to create it acoustic quiet. The blocks behind the goals are the reason for the atmosphere in nearly all stadiums in the World. These are nevertheless the smallest, have a smaller roof above and the 9.8 foot big wall, which blocks sound and fans far from the pitch.[20]

International Soccer Matches of the East Germany national football team[edit]

Between 1957 and 2004, all matches were broadcast by the Deutscher Fernsehfunk and later Eurosport. 2,812,000 visitors came to the matches in all. The Soviet Union was the team with the most matches as foreign team here. The average of the visitor numbers is 63,909 without club team matches, Spartakiade and the East German Sports Festival. The East German national team won 20 matches with 13 drawns and 10 defeats. One match was hosted as national stadium for Poland. 21 matches took place as qualifying matches. 23 matches were exhibition matches.

Date Local time Home Final score (halftime score) Visitor Game type Attendance
1957-05-19 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:1 (1:1) Goals scored:Charles (WAL) 6', Wirth (GDR) 21', Tröger (GDR) 61′ Wales Wales 1958 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Nikolay Latyshev Soviet Union 105,000[21]
1957-10-27 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:4 (1:3) Goals scored: Kraus (TCH) 4′, Moravčík (TCH) 23', Müller (GDR) 23′, Novák (TCH) 43', Kraus (TCH) 88′ Czech Republic Czechoslovakia 1958 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Pierre Schwinte France 110,000
1957-11-09 **:** Poland Poland 0:2 (0:1) Goals scored: Streltsov (URS) 31′, Fiedosov (URS) 75′ Soviet Union Soviet Union 1958 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Clough John Harold England 110,000[22][23]
1958-09-14 **:** East Germany East Germany 3:2 (1:1) Goals scored: Schröter (GDR) 25′, Penalty Constantin (ROU) 27′, Penalty Assmy (GDR) 57′, Ene (ROU) 61′, Wirth (GDR) 76′ Romania Romania Exhibition match – Referee: Nikolai Balakin Soviet Union 60,000
1958-11-02 **:** East Germany East Germany 4:1 (2:1) Goals scored: Assmy (GDR) 4′, Müller (GDR) 12′, Hennum (NOR) 42′, Schröter (GDR) 56′, Müller (GDR) 65′ Norway Norway Exhibition match – Referee: Antonín Vrbovec Czech Republic 60,000[24]
1959-08-12 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:1 (2:0) Goals scored: Schröter (GDR) 3′, Franz (GDR) 44′, Kadraba (TCH) 53′ Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Exhibition match – Referee: Nikolai Latychev Soviet Union 100,000[25][26]
1960-08-17 **:** East Germany East Germany 0:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Ponedelnik (URS) 75′ Soviet Union USSR Exhibition match – Referee: Josef Stoll Austria 70,000[27]
1961-05-14 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Groot (NED) 63′, Erler (GDR) 80′ Netherlands Netherlands 1962 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Carl Jorgensen Denmark 70,000[28]
1961-05-14 **:** East Germany East Germany 4:1 (2:1) Goals scored: Schröter (GDR) 8′, Madsen (DEN) 20′, Ducke (GDR) 29′, Schröter (GDR) 56′, Schröter (GDR) 88′ Denmark Denmark Exhibition match – Referee: Józef Kowal Poland 30,000[29]
1961-05-14 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:2 (0:2) Goals scored: Zambata (YUG) 20′, Jerković (YUG) 43′, Wirth (GDR) 45′, Schröter (GDR) 52′ Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia Exhibition match – Referee: Václav Korelus Czechoslovakia 35,000[30][31]
1964-05-23 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (?:?) Goals scored: ? (GDR) ?′, ? (URS) ?′ Soviet Union USSR Exhibition match – Referee: ? 80,000
1965-05-23 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (1:1) Goals scored: Vogel (GDR) 17′, Bene (HUN) 28′ Hungary Hungary 1966 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Fredrik Johansson Sweden 110,000[32]
1965-10-31 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:0 (1:0) Goals scored: Nöldner (GDR) 1′ Austria AUT 1966 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Samuel Carswell Northern Ireland 95,000
1966-04-27 **:** East Germany East Germany 4:1 (3:1) Goals scored: Ducke (GDR) 2′, Nöldner (GDR) 23′, Kindvall (SWE) 43′, Frenzel (GDR) 57′ Sweden Sweden Exhibition match – Referee: Laurens Van Ravens Netherlands 50,000[33]
1966-07-02 **:** East Germany East Germany 5:2 (2:0) Goals scored: Nöldner (GDR) 3′, Frenzel (GDR) 44′, Tobar (CHI) 62′, Vogel (GDR) 72′, Fräßdorf (GDR) 79′, Marcos (CHI) 81′, Geisler (GDR) 86′ Chile Chile Exhibition match – Referee: Per Engblom Finland 45,000[34]
1967-04-05 **:** East Germany East Germany 4:3 (0:2) Goals scored: Mulder (NED) 10′, Keizer (NED) 12′, Vogel (GDR) 50′, Frenzel (GDR) 62′, Keizer (NED) 65′, Frenzel (GDR) 69′, Frenzel (GDR) 85′ Netherlands Netherlands UEFA Euro 1968 qualifying – Referee: Hannes Sigurðsson Iceland 40,000[35]
1967-10-11 17:00 East Germany East Germany 3:2 (1:2) Goals scored: Dyreborg (DEN) 25′, Körner (GDR) 35′, Søndergaard (DEN) 38′, Pankau (GDR) 59′, Pankau (GDR) 73′ Denmark Denmark UEFA Euro 1968 qualifying – Referee: Ryszard Banasiuk Poland 25,000[36]
1967-10-29 14:00 East Germany East Germany 1:0 (0:0) Goals scored: Frenzel (GDR) 51′ Hungary Hungary UEFA Euro 1968 qualifying – Referee: Robert Helies France 110,000[37]
1968-04-24 **:** East Germany East Germany 3:2 (?:?) Goals scored: ? Bulgaria Bulgaria ? – Referee: ? 35,000
1969-07-25 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:2 (1:1) Goals scored: Löwe (GDR) 6′, Löwe (GDR) 6′, Puzach (URS) 35′, Khmelnytskyi (URS) 59′, Frenzel (GDR) 87′ Soviet Union Soviet Union Exhibition match – Referee: Gyula Emsberger Hungary 90,000[38]
1971-05-09 15:00 East Germany East Germany 1:2 (0:2) Goals scored: Filipović (YUG) 11′, Džajić (YUG) 19′, Puzach (YUG) 35′, Löwe (GDR) 70′ Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia UEFA Euro 1972 qualifying – Referee: Paul Schiller Austria 100,000[39]
1971-09-18 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Borja (MEX) 50′, Löwe (GDR) 80′ Mexico Mexico Exhibition match – Referee: Gyula Emsberger Hungary 20,000[40]
1972-05-27 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:0 (0:0) Goals scored: Irmscher (GDR) 81′ Uruguay Uruguay Exhibition match – Referee: Bohumil Smejkal Czech Republic 20,000[41]
1973-03-26 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:0 (?:?) Goals scored: ? Romania Romania Exhibition match – Referee: ? 95,000[42]
1974-05-29 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Streich (GDR) 66', Channon (GDR) 68' England England Exhibition match – Referee: György Müncz Hungary 100,000[43][44]
1974-12-07 17:30 East Germany East Germany 0:0 (0:0) Goals scored: 0 Belgium Belgium UEFA Euro 1976 qualifying – Referee: Sergio Gonella Italy 35,000

[45]

1975-10-12 14:30 East Germany East Germany 2:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Bathenay (FRA) 50′, Streich (GDR) 55′, Vogel (GDR) 77′ France France UEFA Euro 1976 qualifying – Referee: Erik Fredriksson Sweden 35,000

[46][47]

1976-04-07 **:** East Germany East Germany 0:0 (0:0) Goals scored: 0 Czech Republic Czechoslovakia Football at the 1976 Summer Olympics – Men's qualification – Referee: Vladimir Rudnev Soviet Union 45,000[48]
1977-07-28 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:1 (1:1) Goals scored: Häfner (GDR) 8', Bubnov (USSR) 22', Sparwasser (GDR) 90' Soviet Union Soviet Union Exhibition match – Referee: Marian Kuston Poland 95,000[49]
1977-10-12 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (0:1) Goals scored: Hattenberger (AUT) 43', Löwe (GDR) 50' Austria Austria 1978 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Ian Foote Scotland 100,000[50]
1978-04-04 **:** East Germany East Germany 0:1 (0:0) Goals scored: Åslund (SWE) 75' Sweden Sweden Exhibition match – Referee: Bogdan Dotchev Bulgaria 25,000[51]
1978-09-06 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:1 (1:0) Goals scored: Pommerenke (GDR) 20', Eigendorf (GDR) 66', Ondruš (TCH) 84' Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Exhibition match – Referee: Franz Wöhrer Austria 15,000[52]
1979-04-18 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:1 (0:1) Goals scored: Boniek (POL) 7', Streich (GDR) 50', Lindemann (GDR) 63' Poland Poland UEFA Euro 1980 qualifying – Referee: Azim Zade Soviet Union 55,000[53]
1979-11-21 17:00 East Germany East Germany 2:3 (2:1) Goals scored: Schnuphase (GDR) 17', Streich (GDR) 33', Thijssen (NED) 45', Kist (NED) 50', Kerkhof (NED) 67' Netherlands Netherlands UEFA Euro 1980 qualifying – Referee: António Garrido Portugal 100,000[54][55]
1980-04-16 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:0 (0:0) Goals scored: Weber (GDR) 64', Streich (GDR) 69' Greece Greece Exhibition match – Referee: Torben Månsson Denmark 20,000[56]
1980-10-15 **:** East Germany East Germany 0:0 (0:0) Goals scored:0 Spain Spain Exhibition match – Referee: Jan Veverka Czechoslovakia 30,000[57]
1981-10-10 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:3 (0:2) Goals scored: Szarmach (POL) 2', Smolarek (POL) 5', Schnuphase (GDR) 53', Smolarek (POL) 62', Streich (GDR) 63' Poland Poland 1982 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Augusto Lamo Castillo Spain 85,000[58][59]
1982-04-14 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:0 (1:0) Goals scored: Hause (GDR) 20' Italy Italy Exhibition match – Referee: Dusan Krchnak Czechoslovakia 28,000[60][61]
1983-03-30 17:00 East Germany East Germany 1:2 (0:1) Goals scored: Elst (BEL) 35', Vandenbergh (BEL) 70', Streich (GDR) 82' Belgium Belgium UEFA Euro 1984 qualifying Group 1 – Referee: John Carpenter Republic of Ireland 75,000[62]
1983-06-26 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:3 (1:2) Goals scored: Blokhin (URS) 10', Streich (GDR) 24', Oganesyan (URS) 35', Yevtushenko (URS) 64' Soviet Union Soviet Union Exhibition match – Referee: Károly Palotai Hungary 70,000[63]
1984-10-20 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:3 (1:1) Goals scored: Glowatzky (GDR) 11', Baždarević (YUG) 30', Vokri (YUG) 48', Ernst (GDR) 59', Šestić (YUG) 80' Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Horst Brummeier Austria 63,000[64]
1985-09-11 **:** East Germany East Germany 2:0 (0:0) Goals scored: Ernst (GDR) 53', Kreer (GDR) 81' France France 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Pietro D'Elia Italy 78,000[65][66]
1987-07-28 **:** East Germany East Germany 0:0 (0:0) Goals scored: 0 Hungary Hungary Exhibition match – Referee: Jan Damgaard Denmark 71,000[67]
1989-05-20 **:** East Germany East Germany 1:1 (0:1) Goals scored: Polster (AUT) 3', Kirsten (GDR) 86' Austria Austria 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification – Referee: Alphonse Constantin Belgium 22,000[68]

German Sports Festival (National Olympics for East Germans)[edit]

banner with logo of the sports festival and SV Dynamo

During this festival came at least 150,000.

  • 1956 (2.–5. August): II. Deutsches Turn- und Sportfest
  • 1959 (13.–16. August): III. Deutsches Turn- und Sportfest
  • 1963 (1.–4. August): IV. Deutsches Turn- und Sportfest
  • 1969 (24.–27. July): V. Turn- und Sportfest der DDR
  • 1977 (25.–31. July): VI. Turn- und Sportfest der DDR und VI. Kinder- und Jugendspartakiade
  • 1983 (25.–31. July): VII. Turn- und Sportfest der DDR und IX. Kinder- und Jugendspartakiade
  • 1987 (27. July–2. August): VIII. Turn- und Sportfest der DDR und XI. Kinder- und Jugendspartakiade

See also with 100,000 or more[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 20. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  2. ^ http://www.fussballfanseiten.de/FFSBlog/?page_id=823
  3. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 20. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  4. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 25. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  5. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcE4oRAo2iA
  6. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lF-XLRqqzaM
  7. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGwx0MQmghI
  8. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHmbDYXsrkU
  9. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJa1wAcmCcM
  10. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ8az17fhqk
  11. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B96xBqnrFZY
  12. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 9. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  13. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. pp. 8–18. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  14. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 23. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  15. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 23. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  16. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 25. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  17. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 26. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  18. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 134. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  19. ^ Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel. Das Neue Berlin. p. 28. ISBN 978-3360012807. 
  20. ^ http://www.faz.net/aktuell/sport/fussball/bundesliga-visionen-rb-leipzig-plant-groesseres-stadion-13234217.html
  21. ^ "HISTORISCHE HIGHLIGHTS IM ALTEN ZENTRALSTADION LEIPZIG" (in German). 4 November 2014. 
  22. ^ http://www.leipziger-fussballverband.de/cms2/index.php?page=157
  23. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VvDdVIHk48
  24. ^ http://www.weltfussball.de/spielbericht/freundschaft-1958-november-ddr-norwegen/
  25. ^ http://www.leipziger-fussballverband.de/cms2/index.php?page=157
  26. ^ http://www.fussballdaten.de/freundschaftsspiele/1959/ddr-cssr/
  27. ^ http://www.weltfussball.de/spielbericht/freundschaft-1960-august-ddr-udssr/
  28. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMjE2rC8gXI
  29. ^ http://www.weltfussball.de/spielbericht/freundschaft-1962-mai-ddr-daenemark/
  30. ^ http://www.weltfussball.de/spielbericht/freundschaft-1962-september-ddr-jugoslawien/
  31. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0U_iNAESlo
  32. ^ http://www.fussballdaten.de/wm/1966/europa/qualifikation/gruppe6/ddr-ungarn/
  33. ^ http://www.fussballdaten.de/freundschaftsspiele/1966/ddr-schweden/
  34. ^ http://www.fussballdaten.de/freundschaftsspiele/1966/ddr-chile/
  35. ^ http://www.weltfussball.de/spielbericht/em-qualifikation-1966-1967-gruppe-5-ddr-niederlande/
  36. ^ http://de.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=1968/matches/round=178/match=3891/
  37. ^ http://de.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=1968/matches/round=178/match=3892/index.html
  38. ^ http://www.fussballdaten.de/freundschaftsspiele/1969/ddr-russland/
  39. ^ http://de.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=1972/matches/round=187/match=3809/index.html
  40. ^ http://www.ran.de/datenbank/fussball/freundschaft/ma2187191/ddr_mexiko/direkter-vergleich/
  41. ^ http://www.fussballdaten.de/freundschaftsspiele/1972/ddr-uruguay-1/
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  43. ^ "DDR v England 29th MAY 1974 Joachim Streich" (in German). Youtube. June 6, 2012. Retrieved November 2014. 
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  46. ^ UEFA, Anonym (27 June 2012). "Geschichte Vorrunde der Qualifizierung UEFA Europameisterschaft 1976" [Qualifying round for the UEFA European Cup 1976] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
  47. ^ Youtube, Anonym (21 December 2012). "EM 76 Qualifier DDR v France 12th OCT 1975" [Qualifying round for the UEFA European Cup 1976 GDR vs.FRA] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
  48. ^ Fußballdaten.de. "Die Spielstatistik DDR - Tschechien" [The soccer data GDR vs. Czechoslovakia] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
  49. ^ http://www.weltfussball.de/, Anonym (2000). "DDR Donnerstag, 28. Juli 1977 UdSSR" [GDR vs. USSR July 28, 1977] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
  50. ^ Fußballdaten.de. "Qualifikationsrunde der WM 1978" [Qualification round of the FIFA World Cup 1978] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
  51. ^ weltfussball.de. "Fußballländerspiele 1978" [Soccer international matches 1978] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
  52. ^ http://www.ran.de/, RAN. "Direkter Vergleich DDR gegen CSSR" [Directly comparison between EAST GERMANY vs. CZECHOSLOVAKIA] (in German). Retrieved November 2014. 
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Notes[edit]

The Austrian Biedermeier architecture style (elegant, simple and symmetric)
  • Video documentation: "Täve, Trümmer und Triumphe" | 23.09.2014 | 29:55 Min. | Broadcaster: Mitteldeutscher Rundfunk"

Further reading[edit]

  • Andreas Debski, Michael Kraske, Ingolf Rackwitz (2006). Zentralstadion Leipzig. Vom Stadion der Hunderttausend zum Fussballtempel (in German). Das Neue Berlin. p. 191. ISBN 978-3360012807. 

External links[edit]