Zhang Peiyuan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Zhang Peiyuan
Died 1934
Xinjiang
Allegiance Flag of the Republic of China Republic of China
Years of service 1929-1934
Rank general
Unit Ili garrison
Commands held Governor of Ili
Battles/wars Kumul Rebellion, First Battle of Urumqi (1933), Soviet Invasion of Xinjiang
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhang.

Zhang Peiyuan (died 1934) was a Han chinese general, commander of the Ili garrison. He fought against Uighur and Tungans during the Kumul revolt, but then secretly negotiated with the Tungan general, Ma Zhongying to form an alliance against Sheng Shicai and the Soviet Union.[1][2] Zhang's army had about 3,000 soldiers.[3] They almost destroyed Sheng's armies when the Soviet Union invaded Xinjiang and overran Zhang's forces.[4] Zhang committed suicide to avoid capture by the Soviets at Muzart Pass during a snow storm.[5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David D. Wang (1999). Under the Soviet shadow: the Yining Incident : ethnic conflicts and international rivalry in Xinjiang, 1944-1949. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press. p. 52. ISBN 962-201-831-9. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  2. ^ Pʻing Cheng (1989). Xinjiang: the land and the people. New World Press. p. 54. ISBN 7-80005-078-5. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  3. ^ Howard L. Boorman, Richard C. Howard, Joseph K. H. Cheng (1970). Biographical dictionary of Republican China, Volume 3. Columbia University Press. p. 122. ISBN 0-231-08957-0. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  4. ^ James A. Millward (2007). Eurasian crossroads: a history of Xinjiang. New York City: Columbia University Press. p. 199. ISBN 0-231-13924-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  5. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 120. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  6. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 238. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  7. ^ David D. Wang (1999). Under the Soviet shadow: the Yining Incident : ethnic conflicts and international rivalry in Xinjiang, 1944-1949. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press. p. 53. ISBN 962-201-831-9. Retrieved 2010-06-28.