Zhao Yiguang

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Zhao Yiguang (Chinese: 趙宧光; pinyin: Zhào Yíguāng; 1559–1625) was a writer who lived during the Ming dynasty.

His wife was Lu Qingzi, another famous writer, they were intellectuals and members of the gentry. [1][2] Zhao patronized his wife's books with his money.[3] Zhao Yiguang and Lu had a son, Zhao Jun, who married Wen Congjian's daughter, who was also from a gentry family and literati who wrote poems. The earlier painter Zhao Mengfu was part of their branch of the Song Royal family.[4]

Two of his works are housed in the Wang qishu; they were titled the Jiuhuan shitu 九圜史圖 and the Liuhe mantu 六匌曼圖. They were part of the Siku Quanshu Cunmu Congshu 四庫全書存目叢書.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ellen Widmer, Kang-i Sun Chang, ed. (1997). Writing women in late imperial China. Stanford University Press. p. 93. ISBN 0-8047-2872-0. 
  2. ^ Ellen Widmer, Kang-i Sun Chang, ed. (1997). Writing women in late imperial China. Stanford University Press. p. 26. ISBN 0-8047-2872-0. 
  3. ^ Dorothy Ko (1994). Teachers of the inner chambers: women and culture in seventeenth-century China. Stanford University Press. p. 270. ISBN 0-8047-2359-1. 
  4. ^ Marsha Smith Weidner (1988). Views from Jade Terrace: Chinese women artists, 1300-1912. Indianapolis Museum of Art. p. 31. ISBN 0-8478-1003-8. 
  5. ^ Florence Bretelle-Establet (2010). Looking at it from Asia: the processes that shaped the sources of history of science. Springer. ISBN 90-481-3675-X.