Zhuang Xiaoyan

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Zhuang Xiaoyan
Born (1969-05-04) 4 May 1969 (age 50)
Shenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic of China
Other namesTiger
ResidenceShenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic of China
NationalityChinese
StyleJudo
Teacher(s)Liu Yongfu
OccupationJudo coach

Zhuang Xiaoyan (庄晓岩; born 4 May 1969) is a Chinese judo coach, former international judo champion, and winner of the gold medal for judo in the women's +72 kg (heavyweight) division at the 1992 Summer Olympics.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7] Her medal was China's first Olympic gold medal in judo.

Early life[edit]

Zhuang was born on 4 May 1969 in Shenyang, Liaoning, China.[6][7] Her parents worked in a fertiliser plant.[8] She initially trained in shot put, discus, and javelin, but changed to judo at the age of 14 years.[6] A year later, she was selected for the Liaoning provincial judo team.[8] Her nickname amongst her fellow athletes was 'Tiger.'[8][9]

Competitive judo career[edit]

Zhuang Xiaoyan
Medal record
Women's judo
Representing  China
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1992 Barcelona +72 kg
World Judo Championships
Gold medal – first place 1991 Barcelona Open
Asian Games
Gold medal – first place 1990 Beijing Openweight

In 1986, Zhuang joined the Chinese national judo team.[4] That same year, she came second in the National Judo Championship.[6] In 1987, she was champion in the women's open class at the National Games, and in 1988, she took victory in the same class at the International Judo Championships.[6] Through the late 1980s, she also competed in tournaments at Fukuoka.[10] Her coach for international competition was Liu Yongfu.[11][12] She was listed at 173 cm (5' 8") in height and 98 kg (217 lb.) in weight.[4]

More international victories followed for Zhuang at the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing and the 1991 World Judo Championships in Barcelona.[4] At the 1992 Summer Olympics, Zhuang defeated Estela Rodríguez Villanueva from Cuba to win the gold medal in the women's +72 kg division for judo.[1][2][3][4][6][7] This was China's first Olympic gold medal in judo,[4][7] and was the first of three consecutive victories for China in this competition—Sun Fuming (1996) and Yuan Hua (2000) also won Olympic gold medals in the heaviest women's division in judo.

Following her Olympic victory, Zhuang married and had twin daughters, but separated from her husband a few years later.[8] She retired from judo competition in 1995.[4]

Post-competition career[edit]

Zhuang was one of the torchbearers in the Olympic torch relay for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.[13][14][15] Her fingerprints and footprints are preserved in the flagstones of Beidaihe Olympic Avenue Park, Beidaihe District, along with those of 44 other Chinese Olympic champions.[16] She now trains judo competitors at the Liaoning provincial institute of sports technology.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pellam, J. L. (Ed.) (1996): Who's who of the Asian Pacific rim, 1997–1998 (p. 441). Laguna Beach, CA: Baron's Who's Who. (ISBN 978-1-8822-9209-7)
  2. ^ a b Woolum, J. (1998): Outstanding women athletes: Who they are and how they influenced sports in America (p. 336). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press. (ISBN 978-1-5735-6120-4)
  3. ^ a b DatabaseOlympics.com: 1992 Summer Olympics – Barcelona, Spain – Judo Archived 2012-08-02 at the Wayback Machine (1992). Retrieved on 15 July 2008.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Chinese Olympic Committee: Zhuang Xiaoyan (6 November 2003). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  5. ^ ABC: Olympic medals won in Judo – Heavyweight Women – 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games (c. 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e f ChinaCulture.org: Zhuang Xiaoyan Archived December 5, 2008, at the Wayback Machine (c. 2000). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  7. ^ a b c d China Daily: Zhuang Xiaoyan (29 July 2007). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  8. ^ a b c d DataSports163: 庄晓岩 Archived October 8, 2011, at the Wayback Machine (in Chinese) (c. 2005). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  9. ^ Xinhuanet: 庄晓岩 · 中国第一位奥运柔道冠军 (in Chinese) (16 April 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  10. ^ JudoInside: Zhuang Xiaoyan (c. 2002). Retrieved on 25 April 2010.
  11. ^ Official Website of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games: 'Father of Judo in China' preparing gold medal hopefully Archived January 21, 2011, at the Wayback Machine (19 June 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  12. ^ Yan, H. (2008): Yang Xiuli, new Olympic champion under Chinese magic judo coach Liu Xinhuanet (15 August 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  13. ^ Official Website of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games: Torch relay in Shenyang concludes Archived September 6, 2008, at the Wayback Machine (17 July 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  14. ^ Zhang, R., & Li, Z. (2008): Top sportsmen bolster torch relay in Shenyang Xinhuanet (17 July 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  15. ^ Dalian China: Relay tribute to Olympian No 1 Archived July 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine (18 July 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.
  16. ^ Wang, Y. (2008): A Beidaihe native returns to the seaside resort after 20 years (28 July 2008). Retrieved on 16 April 2010.

External links[edit]