Zick & Sharp

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The Mint, Las Vegas, 1957.
Clark High School, Las Vegas, 1965.

Zick & Sharp, officially Walter Zick & Howard Sharp, was an American architectural firm from Las Vegas, Nevada, in business from 1949 to 1980. The partners were Walter Zick and Harris Sharp.

Partner biographies[edit]

Walter Frederick Zick was born in New York City on May 2, 1905. He was educated at the University of Southern California, obtaining a B.Arch. in 1928 and an M.Ed. in 1932.[1] By the late 1930s he had established an architect's office in Alhambra, California.[2] In 1945 he joined the office of Richard Stadelman & Associates, of Las Vegas. Stadelman's firm, dealing with the Flamingo project, required a larger office staff, and Zick was hired originally for the year alone. However, he grew to love the valley, and remained for the remainder of his career.[3] He left Stadelman in 1948, establishing a partnership with Harris Sharp in November of 1949.[1] Walter Zick was a partner in Zick & Sharp until his retirement in 1980. He died in 1990.

Harris Perry Sharp was born in El Paso, Texas on September 2, 1919. He was educated at the University of Arizona (1937–1938), University of New Mexico (1938–1940), and the University of Southern California, where he received a B.Arch. in 1943. He worked for L. L. Jone, Kenneth Wayne, and the W. C. Kruger Company. In 1947 he became a partner in the office of Las Vegas architect A. Lacey Worswick, who was formerly the city's leading practitioner. Sharp left Worswick's office in 1949 to partner with Walter Zick.[1] Zick & Sharp remained in business until Zick's retirement in 1980. The office was succeeded by Harris Sharp & Associates.

Selected works[edit]

Zick & Sharp, 1949-1980[edit]

Harris Sharp & Associates, from 1980[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e American Architects Directory. 1955.
  2. ^ California Arts and Architecture 1939: 34.
  3. ^ "The Home Of Walter Zick Featured In Paradise Palms Newletter From July 1963". http://veryvintagevegas.com/.[permanent dead link] 1 March 2010.
  4. ^ Engineering Record 1955: 130.
  5. ^ Nicoletta, Julie. Buildings of Nevada. 2000.
  6. ^ Architectural Record 1958: 263.
  7. ^ Hess, Alan. Googie Redux: Ultramodern Roadside Architecture. 2004.
  8. ^ Engineering News-Record 1958: 272.
  9. ^ Moehring, Eugene P. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas: A History. 2007.
  10. ^ Architectural Forum 1959: 115.
  11. ^ American Architects Directory. 1962
  12. ^ American Glass Review 1967: v.
  13. ^ Engineering News-Record 1966: 169.
  14. ^ a b American Architects Directory. 1970.
  15. ^ a b "Nevada Mid-Century Modern Buildings". http://www.roadarch.com/.[permanent dead link] n.d.
  16. ^ "Harris Sharp & Associates". https://www.library.unlv.edu/. n.d.
  17. ^ Engineering News-Record 1 March 1984: 16. New York.