Zuppa toscana

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Zuppa toscana
TypeSoup
Place of originItaly
Region or stateTuscany
Main ingredientsSausage, potatoes, white beans, kale

Zuppa toscana is a broad term, literally meaning 'Tuscan[1] soup',[2] though in Italy it is called "minestra di pane", meaning 'bread soup'. Though there can be many variations on the same Italian food,[3] and though there are certainly many variations under the umbrella of the term 'zuppa toscana', classic zuppa toscana's main ingredients are cannellini beans, potatoes, and kale. A North American version, popularized by Olive Garden and made with Italian sausage, crushed red pepper, diced white onion, bacon, garlic purée, chicken bouillon, heavy cream, potatoes, and kale[4] is richer than the original.

History[edit]

According to the older generation, minestra di pane (zuppa toscana’s ancestor) was originally created as a way to use up leftover, stale bread.[5] For the poor, it was a waste to throw this bread away; instead they made a watery soup out of it.[5] Minestra di pane has been part of Italian culture for a long time—so long, in fact, that there are legends about Leonardo da Vinci eating it himself.[5] This soup has become part of the Tuscan identity.[5][6]

Over time, minestra di pane was modified into zuppa toscana. Recently, this form has been made popular by Olive Garden.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

Zuppa Toscana at the Wikibooks Cookbook subproject

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dictionary.com | Meanings & Definitions of English Words". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 2023-11-25.
  2. ^ "Dictionary.com | Meanings & Definitions of English Words". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 2023-11-25.
  3. ^ Burros, Marian (1992-11-25). "Eating Well". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2023-11-25.
  4. ^ "Olive Garden Zuppa Toscana: Tuscan Soup Recipe made at the restaurant". www.tuscanrecipes.com. Retrieved 2023-11-25.
  5. ^ a b c d Sutton, David E. (December 2004). "Around the Tuscan Table: Food, Family, and Gender in Twentieth-Century Florence. Carole M. Counihan". Journal of Anthropological Research. 60 (4): 587–589. doi:10.1086/jar.60.4.3631155. ISSN 0091-7710.
  6. ^ "Minestra di Pane Recipe - Tuscan Vegetable and Bread Soup". Organic Tuscany Cookbook. 2010-10-25. Retrieved 2023-11-25.