Nancy Lee Harris

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Nancy Lee Harris is an educator as well as a well-established medical professional. She currently serves as a Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School. She is also a physician at Massachusetts General Hospitaland an editor with the New England Journal of Medicine. She was trained at multiple different hospitals; however, the majority of her adult life has been spent working in Boston, Massachusetts. Throughout her life she has held many notable positions including but not limited to: Director of Hematopathology, Director of Surgical Pathology, Director of Anatomic Pathology, Director of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology Residency Program, and Director of Hematopathology Fellowship Program.[1] Harris is an important and distinguished medical provider in the Greater Boston area and focuses her research on blood malignancies and lymphoid neoplasms.

Family[edit]

She is the wife of Jay R. Harris, who is a radiation oncology professor at Harvard Medical School. One son Dan Harris, is the co-anchor of the weekend edition of Good Morning America and married to Dr. Bianca Harris. Another son, Matthew Carmichael Harris is a venture capitalist and married to filmmaker Jessica Glass.

Education and Training[edit]

Nancy Lee Harris performed her internship in Internal Medicine at Washington University Barnes-Jewish Hospital.[1] She then moved to Boston, MA and completed her residency in Anatomic and Clinical pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.[2] Harris rounded out her education by completing a fellowship in Hematopathology at Massachusetts General Hospital and is currently board certified in Anatomy pathology and Clinical pathology.[2]

Harris joined Massachusetts General Hospital in 1980 and has since held a variety of different positions. She started off as the Director of Hematopathology and remained the director until 2009.[1] In 1985, she also became the Director of Surgical Pathology until 1992 when she transitioned to the Director of Anatomic Pathology. She remained the Director of Anatomic Pathology until 1998.[1] In 1996, although she was already the Director of Hematopathology and the Director of Anatomic Pathology, Harris added a third title: Director of Anatomic and Clinical Pathology Residency Program.[1] Harris was in charge of the residency program until 2001.[1] When arriving in 1980, Harris also took on the job of being the Director of Hematopathology Fellowship Program until 2004.[1] Harris now serves as the editor of case records of Massachusetts General Hospital for the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).[3]

Awards and Publications[edit]

Harris mainly focuses her research on blood malignancies like lymphoma; however, she is also interested in lymphoid neoplasms.[2] Along with the World Health Organization and other scientists, Harris helped to develop the Revised European American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms around 2001.[4] This was the first time anyone had come to an international consensus on neoplasm taxonomy.[4] The Revised European American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms was updated in 2008.[5]

A second edition of the Hematopathology reference book was published by Harris and her fellow international experts in September 2016.[6] The book includes updated diagnostic techniques as well as suggestions for molecular and genetic testing.[6] In the last 5 years on top of helping to author this new reference book, Harris has been published over 21 times on PubMed.[7]

Harris became the editor for NEJM of the case records found in Massachusetts General Hospital beginning in 2002 and has since discussed 38 pathological mysteries in her first 10 years.[3] However, because of rapid technological advancement as well as the development of new diagnostic tools, pathological mysteries are becoming harder and harder to find leaving Harris with a smaller sample size of mysteries to review.[3]

For all of her hard work, outstanding professional career, and contributions to medicine, Harris was awarded the J. E. Wallace Sterling Lifetime Achievement Award in Medicine from Stanford University.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "lee harris". Massachusetts General Hospital.
  2. ^ a b c "Dr. Nancy Lee Harris".
  3. ^ a b c Harris, Nancy Lee; Scully, Robert Edward (2011). "The Clinicopathological Conferences (CPCs)" (PDF). In Louis, David N.; Young, Robert Henry (eds.). Keen Minds to Explore the Dark Continents of Disease: A History of the Pathology Services at Massachusetts General Hospital. Massachusetts General Hospital. pp. 349–62. ISBN 978-0-615-48638-3.
  4. ^ a b c "Nancy Lee Harris". Stanford Medicine Alumni Association.
  5. ^ "Nancy Lee Harris, MD".
  6. ^ a b Jaffe, Elaine Sarkin; Arber, Daniel A.; Campo, Elias; Harris, Nancy Lee; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia (2016). Hematopathology. ISBN 978-0-323-29613-7.
  7. ^ Search Results for author Harris NL on PubMed.

Further reading[edit]