Katherine Binney Shippen

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Katherine Binney Shippen
BornKatherine Binney Shippen
(1892-04-01)April 1, 1892
Hoboken, New Jersey, USA
DiedFebruary 20, 1980(1980-02-20) (aged 87)
Suffern, New York
LanguageEnglish
NationalityAmerican
Alma materBryn Mawr
Columbia University
GenreChildren's literature
Notable worksNew Found World
Men, Microscopes, and Living Things
Notable awardsNewbery Honor

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Katherine Binney Shippen (April 1, 1892 – February 20, 1980) was an American history teacher, museum curator, and children's writer.

Early life and education[edit]

Shippen was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, on April 1, 1892, to Francis and Ellen Shippen. She earned a B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 1914 and an M.A. from Columbia University in 1929.[1]

Career[edit]

While studying for her master's degree, Shippen taught history at the Beard School (now Morristown-Beard School) in Orange, New Jersey (1917–26) and then at The Brearley School in Manhattan borough (1926–35). She then served as the headmistress at Miss Fine's School (now Princeton Day School) in Princeton, New Jersey, for the next nine years. In 1945, the Brooklyn Children's Museum named Shippen curator of the social studies department.[2] In the same year, she published her first book, New Found World. Shippen published 21 books throughout her career and twice won the Newbery Honor Award.[3] Several of her books have been translated into Swedish, German, Polish, Spanish, and Greek editions. She died on February 20, 1980 in Suffern, NY.[1]

Books[edit]

Year Title Notes
1945 New Found World[4] 1946 Newbery Honor recipient[3]
Junior Literary Guild selection[1]
1947 The Great Heritage[5] Junior Literary Guild selection[1]
1949 The Bright Design[6] Junior Literary Guild selection[1]
Moses[7]
1950 Passage to America: the story of the great migrations[8]
Lightfoot: the story of an Indian boy[9]
1951 Leif Eriksson, first voyager to America[10]
A Bridle for Pegasus[11]
1953 Big Mose[12]
1954 The pool of knowledge: how the United Nations share their skills[13]
I Know a City: the story of New York's growth[14]
1955 Miracle in motion: the story of America's industry[15]
Men, Microscopes, and Living Things[16] - 1955 Newbery Honor recipient[17]
- Later published under the title So Many Marvels in 1968[18]
Mr. Bell Invents the Telephone[19] Reprinted as Alexander Graham Bell Invents the Telephone, 1982 [20]
1957 Men of Medicine[21]
1958 Andrew Carnegie and the Age of Steel[22]
This Union Cause: The Growth of Organized Labor in America[23]
1959 Milton S. Hershey[24]
1963 Portals to the Past: The Story of Archaeology[25]
Heritage of Music[26]
1964 Men of Archaeology[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Contemporary Authors. 86. Gale Cengage. 2000. pp. 366–367. ISBN 0-7876-3209-0. ISSN 0275-7176.
  2. ^ "Shippen, Katherine B.". Current Biography (Bio Ref Bank). Biography Reference Bank (H.W. Wilson). December 1954. |access-date= requires |url= (help)  – via EBSCO's Biography Reference Bank (H.W. Wilson) (subscription required)
  3. ^ a b "Newbery Medal and Honor Books, 1922-Present". American Library Association. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  4. ^ New Found World. New York: Viking Press. 1945.
  5. ^ The Great Heritage. New York: Viking Press. 1947. ISBN 0-670-34961-5. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  6. ^ The Bright Design. New York: Viking Press. 1949. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  7. ^ Moses. New York: Harper. 1949. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  8. ^ Passage to America: the story of the great migrations. New York: Harper. 1950. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  9. ^ Lightfoot: the story of an Indian boy. New York: Viking Press. 1950. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  10. ^ Leif Eriksson, first voyager to America. New York: Harper & Row. 1951. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  11. ^ A Bridle for Pegasus. New York: Viking Press. 1951. ISBN 0-670-19052-7. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  12. ^ Big Mose. New York: Harper. 1953. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  13. ^ The pool of knowledge: how the United Nations share their skills. New York: Harper. 1954. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  14. ^ I Know a City: the story of New York's growth. New York: Viking Press. 1954. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  15. ^ Miracle in motion: the story of America's industry. New York: Harper & Row. 1954. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  16. ^ Men, Microscopes, and Living Things. New York: Viking Press. 1954. ISBN 0-670-46876-2. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  17. ^ "Newbery Medal and Honor Books, 1922-Present". American Library Association. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  18. ^ So Many Marvels. Angus & Robertson. 1968. ISBN 0-207-94911-5. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  19. ^ Men, Microscopes, and Living Things. New York: Random House. 1955. ISBN 0-670-46876-2. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  20. ^ Alexander Graham Bell Invents the Telephone. New York: Random House. 1982. ISBN 0-394-85338-5. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  21. ^ Men of Medicine. New York: Viking Press. 1957. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  22. ^ Andrew Carnegie and the Age of Steel. New York: Random House. 1958. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  23. ^ This Union Cause: The Growth of Organized Labor in America. New York: Harper. 1958. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  24. ^ Milton S. Hershey. New York: Random House. 1959. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  25. ^ Portals to the Past: The Story of Archaeology. New York: Viking Press. 1963. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  26. ^ Heritage of Music. New York: Viking Press. 1963. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  27. ^ Men of Archaeology. London: Dennis Dobson. 1964. Retrieved 2011-07-30.

External links[edit]