John Newey

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The Very Rev John Newey (4 December 1664–13 September 1735)[1] was an English churchman, Dean of Chichester[2] from 1727 to 1735.[3]

Life[edit]

Born in Kinver, Staffordshire, he was the elder son of Jonathan Newey, Rector of Kinver. Newey was educated at Kinver and at Pembroke College, Oxford (BA: 1686; MA: 1689); DD, 1729.[1]

He married (29 May 1707) Ann Wheeler, daughter of John Wheeler and Dorothy, Wheeler’s first wife.[4] They had two sons and four daughters: Mary (9 September 1708-3 January 1767) married Dr Benjamin Hoadly (Bishop of Winchester); John (c1711-20 April 1737), fellow of Merton College, Oxford; Ann; Jane; Katherine; Samuel (c1722-2 October 1739), educated at Eton College and King’s College, Cambridge.[5]

Newey died on 13 September 1735, at age 70 and is buried at Itchen Abbas church where he is commemorated in two memorials.[5][6]

Career[edit]

Ordained: deacon by John Hough, Bishop of Oxford, 25 June 1690; priest by Thomas Sprat, Bishop of Rochester, 22 May 1692.[7]

Curate at Beckenham from 22 May 1692. Vicar at Wombourne (8 June 1693-10 March 1696).[7] He resigned from this position on grounds of ill health and moved to London becoming Professor of Music at Gresham College (9 October 1696-1 December 1705)[5] and being elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society (30 November 1696).[1] He resumed church duties becoming Rector and then Prebendary of Itchen Abbas (25 April 1707-13 September 1735) shortly before his marriage; Rector: Avington (9 April 1722-31 August 1726); Dean of Chichester (21 June 1728-13 September 1735).[7]

Newey’s books were offered for sale after his death.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The Royal Society. "Fellows Directory". Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  2. ^ "Accommodating High Churchmen: The Clergy of Sussex 1700-1745" Chamberlain,J.S: Champaign, University of Illinois Press, 1997 ISBN 0-252-02308-0
  3. ^ ”Chichester Diocese Clergy Lists:Clergy succession from the earliest times to the year 1900" Hennessy,G: London, St Peter's Press, 1900
  4. ^ The Parish registers of Oldswinford, Worcestershire: vol2, 1693-1718. Birmingham: Birmingham and Midland Society for Genealogy and Heraldry in conjunction with the Stourbridge Historical and Archaelogical Society. 1974. p. 118.
  5. ^ a b c Ward, John (1740). The lives of the Professors of Gresham College : to which is prefixed the life of the founder, Sir Thomas GRESHAM. With an Appendix, consisting of orations, lectures, and letters, writen by the Professors, with other papers serving to illustrate the lives. London: for the Author; sold by W. Innys, J. and P. Knapton, &c.; pr. John Moore. pp. 233–234.
  6. ^ George John Armytage, ed. (1899). "Obituary prior to 1800: (as far as relates to England, Scotland, and Ireland)". Internet Archive. Harleian Society. p. 283. Retrieved 11 September 2015.
  7. ^ a b c "Clergy of the Church of England Database 1540-1835". Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  8. ^ Whiston, John (1738). A catalogue of several thousand volumes; among which is the library of John Newey, … Which will be sold … on Thursday the 16th of November 1738. s.n.: s.l.
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Thomas Sherlock
Dean of Chichester
1727–1735
Succeeded by
Thomas Hayley