Area Codes (song)

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"Area Codes"
Single by Ludacris featuring Nate Dogg
from the album Rush Hour 2 Soundtrack and Word of Mouf
Released July 3, 2001
Recorded 2000-2001
Genre Hip hop
Length 5:03
Label Disturbing tha Peace, Def Jam
Writer(s) D. Davis, K. Hilson, J. Jones, R. Walters, C. Bridges
Producer(s) Jazze Pha
Ludacris singles chronology
"Southern Hospitality"
(2000)
"Area Codes"
(2001)
"Rollout (My Business)"
(2001)

"Area Codes" is a song by American hip hop recording artist Ludacris, released as the lead single from his third album, Word of Mouf (2001). It features Nate Dogg. The song's lyrics focus on U.S. telephone area codes that denote the location of women with whom the rapper has had sexual relations in cities across the United States.[1]

The song was written by D. Davis, K. Hilson, J. Jones, R. Walters, and C. Bridges[2] and was produced by Jazze Pha.[3]

Overview[edit]

At five minutes and three seconds, it is the fifth-longest track on the album. The song was originally released on the soundtrack to Rush Hour 2.

It debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 at No. 84 on July 14, 2001 and peaked at No. 24 on September 8, 2001.

The song was also included briefly in a scene from The Fast and the Furious.

Chart (2001) Peak
position
Australian ARIA Singles Chart[4] 97
French Singles Chart 43
New Zealand Singles Chart[5] 40
US Billboard Hot 100 24
US Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs 10
US Billboard Rap Songs 7

Legacy[edit]

Because telephone area codes are increasingly becoming less constrained to particular geographic areas, scholars and cultural critics have noted that "Area Codes" may be incomprehensible to future generations of listeners.[1]

Area codes mentioned[edit]

These are the area codes listed in the song, in order.

  • 770 (Atlanta, Georgia)
  • 404 (Atlanta, Georgia)
  • 718 (New York City, New York, except Manhattan)
  • 202 (Washington, D.C.)
  • 901 (Memphis, Tennessee)
  • 305 (Miami, Florida)
  • 312 (Chicago, Illinois)
  • 313 (Detroit, Michigan)
  • 215 (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
  • 803 (Columbia, South Carolina)
  • 757 (Southeast Virginia)
  • 410 (eastern Maryland)
  • 504 (New Orleans, Louisiana)
  • 972 (Dallas, Texas)
  • 713 (Houston, Texas)
  • 314 (St. Louis, Missouri)
  • 201 (Bergen and Hudson counties, New Jersey)
  • 212 (Manhattan, New York)
  • 213 (Los Angeles, California)
  • 916 (Sacramento, California)
  • 415 (San Francisco, California)
  • 704 (Charlotte, North Carolina)
  • 206 (Seattle, Washington)
  • 808 (Hawaii & Midway Island)
  • 216 (Cleveland, Ohio)
  • 702 (Las Vegas, Nevada)
  • 414 (Milwaukee, Wisconsin)
  • 317 (central Indiana)
  • 214 (Dallas, Texas)
  • 281 (Houston, Texas)
  • 334 (Montgomery and south Alabama)
  • 205 (Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, Alabama)
  • 318 (Louisiana)
  • 601 (Mississippi)
  • 203 (Connecticut)
  • 804 (Virginia)
  • 402 (Nebraska)
  • 301 (Maryland)
  • 904 (Jacksonville, Florida)
  • 407 (Orlando metro area, Florida)
  • 850 (the Florida Panhandle)
  • 708 (Cook and Will counties, Illinois)
  • 502 (Louisville, Kentucky)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Urbina, Ian (October 1, 2004). "Area Codes, Now Divorced From Their Areas". New York Times. Retrieved November 23, 2010. "And as area codes lose their foothold, certain cultural references may also drop their meaning. "How long before Ludacris's 'Area Code' ceases to make sense?" asked Mr. Rojas, referring to a song in which the rapper uses only area codes to refer to locations where he has had sexual encounters. "That song only works if people know where each area code is located."" 
  2. ^ "Word of Mouf:Composers". Archived from the original on 2007-03-09. Retrieved 2006-12-06. 
  3. ^ "Word of Mouf:Song Listings". Archived from the original on 10 December 2006. Retrieved 2006-12-06. 
  4. ^ "Pandora Archive". Pandora.nla.gov.au. 2006-08-23. Retrieved 2012-01-14. 
  5. ^ "LUDACRIS IN NEW ZEALAND CHARTS". Charts.org.nz. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 January 2014. 

External links[edit]