Brodhead's Coshocton expedition

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Coshocton Expedition
Part of American Revolutionary War
Date April 1781
Location Coshocton, Ohio
Result American victory
Belligerents
 United States
Flag of Ohio.svg Friendly Delaware people
Flag of Ohio.svg Hostile Delaware people
Commanders and leaders
Daniel Brodhead
Gelelemend
?
Strength
284 80
Casualties and losses
? 15 killed, 20 prisoners

Brodhead's Coshocton Expedition was a campaign by the United States against hostile Delaware people. Led by Daniel Brodhead, the Americans slaughtered the hostile Delawares.

Expedition[edit]

On April 7, Brodhead, 150 regulars, and 134 militiamen headed out along the Ohio River. Several of the Delawares had sided with the British, and raided the American soil. Some Friendly Indians led by Gelelemend guided him to the nearby village of Coshocton, Ohio. He divided his men into three regiments, surprising the villagers, who laid their own village to waste. 15 warriors were killed and 20 civilians were taken prisoner. Then, he marched on Newcomer's Town where an Indian asked for the "Big Captain". Brodhead came out and asked for the enemy chiefs, promising that he would not kill them. But Lewis Wetzel, a militiaman, took out a tomahawk and killed the chief from behind. Then, Brodhead advanced to Newcomerstown and took a hunter captive after hearing his gunfire at a squirrel. Then, Brodhead returned to Pittsburgh. Later, in 1782, the colonists came back to the area to kill several Moravian Indians in what became known as the Gnadenhutten massacre.

References[edit]

[1] By State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Lyman Copeland Draper, Reuben Gold Thwaites, Milo Milton Quaife