Burgo's Catch Phrase

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Burgo's Catch Phrase
Also known as Catch Phrase (1997-1999)
Genre Game show
Based on Catch Phrase
Directed by Ian Jobsz
Presented by John Burgess
Narrated by Cameron Humphrey (1997-2002)
Pete Smith (2003)
Country of origin Australia
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 7
Production
Executive producer(s) Michael Boughen
Wayne Cameron
Producer(s) Steve Rothwell
Location(s) Sydney, New South Wales
Camera setup David Phipps
Brett Beverley
Justin Rule
David Sliwinski
Running time 30 minutes (inc. commercials)
Production company(s) Southern Star Group (1997-2001)
Southern Star Endemol (2002-2003)
Broadcast
Original channel Nine Network
Picture format 4.3 PAL (1997-2001)
16.9 576i (SDTV) (2002-2003)
Audio format Stereo
Original run 1997-September 2001
12 August 2002 – 2003

Burgo's Catch Phrase was an Australian game show that ran between 1997 and 2003, produced by Southern Star Group (and later by the joint-venture Endemol Southern Star) for the Nine Network. The show was based on the British and American versions of the game, and was originally knowned simply as Catch Phrase until 1999 where the show was renamed as Burgo's Catch Phrase after the host in its honour, John Burgess. The show was cancelled three times in 1998, 2001 and 2003 after failing ratings despite a revamp of the set in 2002.

Contestants would have to identify the familiar phrase represented by a piece of animation, with the show's mascot — a character called "Jimmy" — often appearing. In the original run, two contestants played in each game, but in the 2002 revamp, this was increased to three.

The Main Game[edit]

In the main game, at the start of each round, one contestant stopped a randomizer which consisted of money amounts by hitting his/her button. The value that was landed would then be the amount for the normal catch phrases. On each normal catch phrase, the computer would draw it on the screen. When it was done, a bell would ring, signifying the contestants to buzz-in when they think they know the answer.

A correct answer won the contestant the predetermined money amount, plus a chance to solve the Bonus Catch Phrase which was hidden behind nine squares with the show's logo on each. To choose a square, the contestant had to hit their button to stop a randomizer from flashing around the board after which the square was revealed, and they had a chance to guess. A correct answer won bonus money for the player ($100 for the first round, $200 for the second round and $300 for the third round.) Also, one square in each round's Bonus Catch Phrase offered a small mystery prize if hit.

In the 2002 revival, if in the second round, the Bonus Catch Phrase was solved after 5 squares or less, another round worth $200 was played. Also, there was a mystery Cash Prize of $200 in each game, which jackpotted if it was not won.

After three rounds, the player with the most money won the game and played the Super Catch Phrase.

Super Catch Phrase[edit]

The final round involved a game board (5 by 5 grid) with 25 lettered squares (A-Y) with catchphrases hidden behind each. The winning contestant had the task to capture five squares in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal line within 60 seconds. Prizes were won if successful, with a larger prize if the winning player used the central "M" square. It is possible to win both prizes if two lines were made, where one line did went through the "M" square and the other line didn't go through the "M" square.

From their fifth winning show onwards, champions could win a car by completing a line through the "M" square. (For a period[chronology citation needed] in the original run, the "M" square was renamed "VW" after the sponsor of the car prize, even when the car was not yet able to be won; later, the "VW" square was changed to the "Hyundai" square with the square showing Hyundai's symbol since the car prize was sponsored by Hyundai, contestants have to say the "Hyundai" if they want to go for the middle square; however, in the 2002 revamp, the square reverted to "M".) Contestants could return for as many episodes as required until defeated, or until they won the car.

See also[edit]