Clonbanin Ambush

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Clonbanin Ambush
Part of the Irish War of Independence
Date 5 March 1921
Location Clonbanin, County Cork
Result IRA victory
Belligerents
Flag of Ireland.svg Irish Republican Army United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland British Army
Commanders and leaders
Flag of Ireland.svg Seán Moylan
Flag of Ireland.svg Tom McEllistrim
Flag of Ireland.svg Paddy O'Brien
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Brigadier-General Hanway Robert Cumming 
Strength
almost 100 volunteers[1]
1 machine gun[2]
almost 40 soldiers[2]
1 armoured car[2]
Casualties and losses
none 13 dead, 15 wounded(Lynch/O'Donoghue)
4 dead (Hopkinson)[clarification needed]
Clonbanin Ambush is located in island of Ireland
Clonbanin Ambush
Location within island of Ireland

The Clonbanin Ambush was an ambush carried out by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) on 5 March 1921, during the Irish War of Independence. It took place in the townland of Clonbanin (aka Cloonbannin), County Cork.

The IRA force comprised almost 100 volunteers from counties Cork and Kerry, armed with rifles, hand grenades and a machine gun. Their target was a British Army convoy of three lorries, an armoured car and a touring car carrying Brigadier General Hanway Robert Cumming. The convoy was travelling from Killarney to Buttevant and comprised almost 40 soldiers of the East Lancashire Regiment.

When the convoy entered the ambush position, IRA volunteers opened fire from elevated positions on both sides of the road. The three lorries and touring car were disabled, and the armoured car became stuck in the roadside ditch (although those inside fired from its machine guns). As Cumming jumped from his car, he was shot in the head and died instantly.

The battle lasted slightly over an hour. As the IRA forces withdrew from one side of the road, a British officer and six soldiers attempted to flank the IRA on the other side. After a brief exchange of fire they retreated.

The IRA are not believed to have sustained any casualties.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chronology of Irish History 1919 - 1923
  2. ^ a b c "Brigadier Slain in Irish Ambush" - New York Times (7 March 1921)

External links[edit]