Dan Schreiber (producer)

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Dan Schreiber is a radio producer living in the United Kingdom and is also a writer for radio and television. He is most noted for co-creating the BBC Radio 4 panel show The Museum of Curiosity with host John Lloyd and co-producer Richard Turner.[1] Schreiber was born in Hong Kong to an Australian father, before moving to Australia aged 12, and then moving to the United Kingdom at 19.[2][3]

Schreiber also acts as one of the researchers or "Elves" for the television panel game QI.[4] On 30 July 2009, Schreiber hosted his own unnamed radio pilot which was performed in a manner similar to a radio breakfast show. It is yet to be known if the show will be given a full series.[5] He has contributed to a number of books including "The Naked Jape" by Jimmy Carr and QI books: "The Book of General Ignorance" and "G Annual".

Schreiber also acted as executive producer for Ken Russell's short Christmas film A Kitten for Hitler,[6] and Flight of the Conchords star Rhys Darby's stand-up DVD "Imagine That!"

As a stand up Schreiber toured with FolkFace (from the Radio 1's Chris Moyles Show).

Schreiber is a regular panelist on the E4 show Dirty Digest and is also working on his first book, Brian Blessed For Beginners.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wolf, Ian. "The Museum of Curiosity – Production Details, Plus Regular Cast and Crew". British Comedy Guide. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  2. ^ Schreiber, Dan (13 June 2010). "@ianwolf I am also, I should add, a Hong Kongian from birth-12. Is Hong Kong in the world cup?". Twitter. Retrieved 13 June 2010. 
  3. ^ Schreiber, Dan (13 June 2010). "@ianwolf I'm an Aussie. My dad is Australian & I grew up there from 12–19 (high school) family still live there.". Twitter. Retrieved 13 June 2010. 
  4. ^ "The People Behind QI". QI. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  5. ^ "My Radio Show". British Comedy Guide. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  6. ^ Russell, Ken (27 September 2009). "My Kitten for Hitler is all in the best bad taste". London: The Times. Retrieved 17 August 2009. 

External links[edit]