Frederick T Callcott

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1899 Memorial to the crew of Friend to all Nations, Margate

Frederick Thomas Callcott (1854 - 11 May 1923)[1] was a British sculptor and artist.

Early life[edit]

Frederick Thomas Callcott was born in St Clement Danes, London, the son of Frederick Herbert Callcott. The architect, Charles William Callcott (born 1864) was his younger brother.

Career[edit]

Callcott designed the interior carved panels in the Black Lion, a Grade II* listed public house at 274 Kilburn High Road, Kilburn, London.[2]

Callcott was also responsible for some of the work in The Black Friar, Blackfriars.

In 1899, Callcott was responsible for sculpting the memorial to the nine out of a crew of 13 who died in a failed rescue attempt by the boat Friend to all Nations in Margate in 1897.[1]

Callcott died on 11 May 1923. He was living at 17 Woodstock Road, Golders Green, London, but died in St Leonards on Sea, Sussex.

Personal life[edit]

Callcott married fellow sculptor, Florence Newman (1867–1938) on 9 April 1912 in All Saints, St John's Wood, London.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Frederick Thomas Callcott". Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951, University of Glasgow History of Art and HATII, online database 2011. Retrieved 18 April 2014. 
  2. ^ "Black Lion public house". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 18 April 2014.