Göteborg-class destroyer

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HMS Göteborg (J5).jpg
HMS Göteborg (J5)
Class overview
Operators:  Swedish Navy
Preceded by: Klas-class destroyer
Succeeded by: Visby-class destroyer
Built: 1933-1941
In commission: 1936-1968
Planned: 6
Completed: 6
Active: 0
Retired: 6
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer/Frigate
Displacement: 1,060-1,240 tons
Length: 92.7 m (304 ft)
Beam: 9 m (30 ft)
Draught: 3.8 m (12 ft)
Propulsion: Twin screws, turbines
Speed: 39 knots
Range: 3,333 km (1,800 nmi; 2,071 mi)(1800nm)
Complement: 130
Armament: 3 × 120 mm canons, 4 × 25 mm bofors anti-air, 6 × 530 mm torpedo tubes
depth charges and mines

Göteborg class was a Swedish World War II destroyer class. Built 1936-1941 the class was designed as escort and neutral guard destroyers. In total six ships were constructed, HMS Göteborg, HMS Stockholm, HMS Malmö, HMS Karlskrona, HMS Gävle and HMS Norrköping. After World War II the destroyers, later rebuilt as frigates, continued to serve in the Swedish navy. The last ship was decommissioned in 1968.

History[edit]

In 1933 the Swedish government granted the construction of two new destroyers.[1] The destroyers were given names after Swedish coast towns and was because of this called Stadsjagare (City destroyers). The first ship was delivered in 1936 and the second in 1937. In 1936 two additional destroyers were ordered and after the war broke out a third pair was ordered as well.[2] After the war all destroyers except gothenburg which was in a poor shape from the Hårsfjärden disaster received a refit where the center gun where moved to the X position on the aft deckhouse and the anti aircraft armament where concentrated to a platform around the rear funnel and consistign of four modern Bofors 40mm L/70 guns. In 1958-1963 three of the destroyers were rebuilt as frigates that included a change of armament. The first ship to be decommissioned was Göteborg in 1958. In the decade that followed all ships were decommissioned with the last in 1968.

The famous Swedish marine engineer Curt Borgenstam called the Göteborg class the most beautiful and well working destroyer class to have served in the Swedish navy.[3]

HMS Stockholm after modernization
HMS Göteborg sinking after being used as a target ship

Ships[edit]

Name Number Builder Laid Down Launched Commissioned Fate
Göteborg 5 Götaverken 1934 14 October 1935 October 1936 Stricken 15 August 1958[4]
Sunk as target 14 August 1962[5]
Stockholm 6 Karlskrona dockyard 1934 24 March 1936 27 November 1937 Stricken 1 January 1964[4]
Scrapped 1965[6]
Malmö 7 Eriksberg 1937 22 September 1938 15 August 1939 Stricken 1 January 1964[4]
Scrapped 1970[6]
Karlskrona 8 Karlskrona dockyard 1937 19 June 1939 12 September 1940 Stricken 1 July 1974[4]
Scrapped 1979[6]
Norrköping 10 Eriksberg 1939 25 September 1940 9 April 1941 Stricken 1 February 1965[4]
Gävle 9 Götaverken 1939 23 September 1940 30 June 1941 Stricken 6 December 1968[4]
Used as generator at Simpevarp nuclear power station[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Borgenstam, Insulander & Kaudern 1989, p. 48
  2. ^ Borgenstam, Insulander & Kaudern 1989, p. 50
  3. ^ Borgenstam, Insulander & Kaudern 1989, p. 52
  4. ^ a b c d e f Whitley 2000, p. 249.
  5. ^ Gardiner and Chesneau 1980, p. 372.
  6. ^ a b c d Gardiner and Chumbley 1995, p. 443.

Sources[edit]

  • Jackson, Robert "Fighting Ships of The World." London: Amber Books Ltd, 2004 Pg.306 ISBN 9781840136470
  • Borgenstam, Curt; Insulander, Per; Kaudern, Gösta (1989), Jagare : med svenska flottans jagare under 80 år (2:a ed.), Karlskrona: Västra Frölunda CB Marinlitteratur, ISBN 91-970700-4-1 
  • Gardiner, Stephen; Chumbley (1995), Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1947–1995, Annapolis, Maryland, USA: Naval Institute Press, ISBN 1-55750-132-7 
  • Gardiner, Roger; Chesneau (1980), Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946, London: Conway Maritime Press, ISBN 0-85177-146-7 
  • Whitley, M. J. (2000), Destroyers of World War Two: An International Encyclopedia, London: Cassell, ISBN 1-85409-521-8