Harbor Lights

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This article is about a popular song. For other uses, see Harbour Lights (disambiguation).
"Harbour Lights"
Music by Hugh Williams
Lyrics by Jimmy Kennedy
Published 1937
Original artist Frances Langford
Recorded by Sammy Kaye, Guy Lombardo, Bing Crosby, Ray Anthony, Ralph Flanagan, Elvis Presley, The Platters, Ken Griffin, The Ink Spots, Lawrence Welk, Willie Nelson, Vera Lynn, Irena Santor

"Harbor Lights" is a popular song by Hugh Williams (pseudonym for Will Grosz) with lyrics by Jimmy Kennedy. This song was originally sung by Frances Langford in 1937,[1] and was published again in 1950.

The song has been recorded by many artists; charting versions were recorded by Sammy Kaye, Guy Lombardo, Bing Crosby, Ray Anthony, Ralph Flanagan, Elvis Presley, The Platters (peaking at #8 on the Billboard charts in 1960), and Ken Griffin. Other versions were recorded by The Ink Spots, Lawrence Welk, Willie Nelson, Vera Lynn and Jon Rauhouse. A Polish version titled "Portowe światła", with lyrics by Herold (pseudonym for Henryk Szpilman), was recorded in 1938 by Mieczysław Fogg (released as Syrena Electro 2035),[2] shortly after World War II by Tadeusz Miller (released as Melodje 118),[3] and by Irena Santor in 1966 (released as Muza XL0311).[4]

The biggest-selling version was recorded by the Sammy Kaye orchestra. The recording was released by Columbia Records as a 78 rpm single and a 45 rpm single. The record first reached the Billboard charts on September 1, 1950 and lasted 25 weeks, peaking at #1.[5]

The Guy Lombardo orchestra recording of August 24, 1950 was released by Decca Records. The record first reached the Billboard charts on October 6, 1950 and lasted 20 weeks, peaking at #2.[5]

The Bing Crosby recording was released by Decca Records. The record first reached the Billboard charts on November 3, 1950 and lasted 11 weeks, peaking at #10.[5]

The Ray Anthony orchestra recording was released by Capitol Records. The flip side was "Nevertheless". The record first reached the Billboard charts on October 20, 1950 and lasted 15 weeks on the chart, peaking at #15.[5]

The Ralph Flanagan orchestra recording was released by RCA Victor Records. The record first reached the Billboard charts on October 27, 1950 and lasted 5 weeks, peaking at #27.[5]

The Ken Griffin recording was released by Columbia Records. The record reached the Billboard charts on October 20, 1950 and lasted only one week, charting at #27.[5]

The Marco T. y Los Gatos Montañeros recording was released by Tulsan Records Private on September 14, 1987.[citation needed]


Preceded by
"Goodnight, Irene" by Gordon Jenkins and The Weavers
U.S. Billboard Best Sellers in Stores number-one single
November 18–25, 1950
Succeeded by
"The Thing" by Phil Harris
Preceded by
Goodnight, Irene
Cash Box magazine best selling record chart
#1 record

November 11–December 9, 1950
Succeeded by
The Thing
Preceded by
The Thing
Cash Box magazine best selling record chart
#1 record

December 23, 1950
Succeeded by
The Tennessee Waltz

References[edit]

  1. ^ Billboard Top singles of 1937
  2. ^ Lerski, Tomasz M. (2007). Encyklopedia kultury polskiej XX wieku. Muzyka - teatr - film. T.1: Muzyka mechaniczna - pierwsze 40-lecie. Warszawa: Polskie Wydawnictwo Naukowo-Encyklopedyczne. p. 277. ISBN 83-917189-9-9. 
  3. ^ Żyliński, Jacek. "Katalog Polskich Płyt Gramofonowych". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Żyliński, Jacek. "Katalog Polskich Płyt Gramofonowych". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research.