Henry Peacham

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The Complete Gentleman by Henry Peacham (1622). Engraving by Francis Delaram.

Henry Peacham is the name shared by two English Renaissance writers who were father and son.

Biographies[edit]

The elder Henry Peacham (1546–1634) was an English curate, best known for his treatise on rhetoric titled The Garden of Eloquence first published in 1577. He lived at Leverton-in-Holland, in Lincolnshire.[1]

His son, Henry Peacham (b. 1578, d. in or after 1644) was a poet and writer,[2] known today primarily for his book, The Compleat Gentleman, first printed in 1622. It is presented as a guidebook on the arts for young men of good birth. In it, he discusses what writers, poets, composers, philosophers, and artists a gentlemen should study in order to become well-educated. Because he mentions a large number of contemporary artistic figures, he is often cited as a primary source in studies of Renaissance artists.

A representative passage from The Compleat Gentleman:

"For composition, I prefer next Ludovico de Victoria, a most judicious and a sweet composer: after him Orlando di Lasso, a very rare and excellent Author, who lived some forty years since in the court of the Duke of Bavier."

Further reading[edit]

The Elder[edit]

  • Shawn Smith, "Henry Peacham the Elder," The Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 236: British Rhetoricians and Logicians, 1500–1660, First Series, Detroit: Gale, 2001, pp. 188–201.
  • Willard R. Espy, The Garden of Eloquence: A Rhetorical Bestiary, New York: Dutton, 1983
  • Alan R. Young, "Henry Peacham, Author of The Garden of Eloquence (1577): A Biographical Note," Notes and Queries, vol. 24, 1977, pp. 503–507
Page from Minerua Britanna or A garden of heroical deuises, 1612

The Younger[edit]

  • Edward Chaney, The Evolution of English Collecting (New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 2003)
  • John Horden, "Peacham, Henry (b. 1578, d. in or after 1644)," Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004
  • Alan R. Young, Henry Peacham, Boston: Twayne, 1979.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Peacham, Henry jnr, Minerva Brittanica, London (1612), p.170 emblem "Zelus in Dream"
  2. ^ Peacham 1664

References[edit]

External links[edit]