John A. Adam

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John A. Adam is a writer and editor, based in Washington, D.C.

Assignments have taken him from Southwest Asia to the backwaters of the Amazon. He has profiled numerous leaders in science and technology, including Internet pioneers Bob Kahn and Vint Cerf, pacemaker inventor Wilson Greatbatch, and earth scientist Marcia McNutt. Among his investigative reports: cryptography, stealth aircraft, arms control verification, Brazil's power, and the Gulf War.

His first book, forthcoming, draws on a communications theme to portray the founding of the United States through the life of Benjamin Franklin. The non-fiction epic narrative is based on more than ten years of research, mostly at the U.S. Library of Congress.

His journalism has appeared in the New York Times and Washington Post as well as Scientific American, ARTnews and Discover. He was honored four times in the National Magazine Awards while a staff writer at IEEE Spectrum. Awards were for reporting (1993 winner, with Glenn Zorpette); for public service (finalist, 1988); and twice for special issues (1986 and 1990).[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Deirdre Carmody, "National Rewards for Magazines Great and Small", The New York Times, April 22, 1993
  2. ^ John Holusha, "The Media Business: How an Association Monthly Reaps Prizes for Reporting", The New York Times, May 3, 1993