Leo Goodman

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Leo A. Goodman
Born (1928-08-07) August 7, 1928 (age 86)
New York City
Residence United States
Citizenship United States
Fields Statistics, sociology, analysis of categorical data
Institutions University of Chicago, University of California, Berkeley
Alma mater Syracuse University, Princeton University
Doctoral advisor Samuel S. Wilks, John Tukey
Known for Social statistics, analysis of categorical data, Goodman and Kruskal's lambda, Goodman and Kruskal's gamma
Notable awards Elected member of each of the three main learned societies (national academies) in the U.S.: The National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society; Honorary degree D.Sc. from Univ. of Michigan; Honorary degree D.Sc. from Syracuse Univ.; R.A. Fisher Lectureship; Samuel S. Wilks Memorial Medal; Henry L. Rietz Lectureship; Career of Distinguished Scholarship Award; Inaugural Otis Dudley Duncan Lectureship; Paul F. Lazarsfeld Award for a career of distinguished contributions to sociological methodology; Samuel A. Stouffer Methodology Award; Elected member of the Sociological Research Association; A Special Creativity Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF), and other awards and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Commission, the Social Science Research Council, and the NSF.

Leo A. Goodman (born August 7, 1928) is the Class of 1938 Professor at the University of California at Berkeley. He is an elected member of each of the three main learned societies (national academies) in the U.S.: The National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society.

The University of Michigan has conferred the honorary degree Doctor of Science on him, and another honorary D.Sc. degree was also conferred on him by Syracuse Univ. The honorary degree conferred on him by the Univ. of Michigan was for "his major contributions to statistics and social and behavioral sciences, and in particular for his development of new methods for the analysis of survey data as a sophisticated branch of statistical science ... . He has had a profound impact on methods of statistical analysis used in the social and behavioral sciences. In particular, he has had a most important role in elevating the analysis of survey data from an art form to a rigorous branch of statistical science, particularly in sociology, by providing a set of interrelated statistical tools that enable researchers to examine qualitative/categorical data with scientific rigor. His introduction and further development of these and related tools led to revolutionary changes in the methods now used in social science research involving categorical data."

He is also the recipient of various other honors and awards from the American Statistical Association (AStatA), the American Sociological Association (ASocA), and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS), including the Samuel S. Wilks Memorial Medal (presented by the AStatA), the Career of Distinguished Scholarship Award (presented by the ASocA), the Henry L. Rietz Lectureship (presented by the IMS), and the inaugural Otis Dudley Duncan Lectureship and the Paul F. Lazarsfeld Award for a career of distinguished contributions to sociological methodology (presented by the ASocA Methodology Section). He has also received the Samuel A. Stouffer Methodology Award (presented by the ASocA), and the R.A. Fisher Lectureship from the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies. He is also an elected member of the Sociological Research Association.

He has received a Special Creativity Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF), and he has also received other awards and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulbright Commission, the Social Science Research Council, and the NSF.

In 2005 the ASocA Methodology Section established the Leo A. Goodman Award to recognize contributions to sociological methodology, and/or innovative uses of sociological methodology, made by a scholar who is no more than fifteen years past the Ph.D.

His many published articles have been highly cited. The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) has identified him as an "ISI Highly Cited Researcher," one of the "250 most cited researchers in the last two decades, for their published articles in the Mathematics category." For the Mathematics category, citations of the researcher's articles published in mathematics journals are considered, with statistics journals included in that category.

His most cited article was written jointly with William H. Kruskal on the introduction and development of various measures of association for the analysis of cross-classified categorical data. The ISI selected this article as a "Citation Classic," and he and Kruskal were invited to write a commentary on that article, which the ISI published in Current Contents, Social and Behavioral Sciences. According to the ISI, this article still continues each year to be cited in a wide range of different articles in journals that cover a very wide range of different fields of study. His second most cited article was written jointly with Ted W. Anderson on statistical inference about Markov Chains. This article was Anderson's most cited article. According to the ISI, this joint article still continues each year to be cited by a wide range of different articles in journals that cover a very wide range of different fields of study (as was the case noted above by the ISI for the joint article with Kruskal).

He was born in New York City in 1928, and he graduated from Syracuse University in 1948, majoring in mathematics and sociology, with an A.B. degree, summa cum laude, and as the valedictorian. He went on to pursue graduate studies in mathematics, with an emphasis on mathematical statistics, in the Mathematics Department at Princeton University, and in 1950 he was awarded the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees there. His doctoral advisors were the late Professors Samuel S. Wilks and John Tukey. He then became a faculty member at the University of Chicago in the Statistics Department and the Sociology Department, and he served there from 1950 until 1987, and as the Charles L. Hutchinson Distinguished Service Professor from 1970 to 1987. He was also a research associate at the University of Chicago Population Research Center from 1967 to 1987. Starting in 1987, he became a faculty member in the Sociology Department and the Statistics Department at the University of California at Berkeley where he is the Class of 1938 Professor.

He was at Cambridge University in 1953-54 and 1959-60 as a Visiting Professor at Clare College and in the Statistical Laboratory at the university there, and at Columbia University in 1960-61 as a Visiting Professor in the Department of Sociology and the Department of Mathematical Statistics. He was also at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, in Stanford, California in 1984-85.

External links[edit]

Leo Goodman at the Mathematics Genealogy Project