Mary O'Grady

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Mary O'Grady
Mary O'Grady.jpg
Born Mary Anastasia O'Grady
Pennsylvania, United States
Occupation Editor, columnist
Employer The Wall Street Journal

Mary O'Grady — also frequently published as Mary Anastasia O'Grady — is an editor of the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) and member of the Wall Street Journal Editorial Board since 2005. She writes predominantly on Latin America and is a co-editor of the Index of Economic Freedom.

Biography[edit]

O'Grady joined the WSJ in 1995 and became a senior editorial page writer in 1999. Previously she was an options strategist for Advest, Thomson McKinnon Securities then Merrill Lynch, where she worked for 10 years. She has a bachelor's degree in English from Assumption College and an M.B.A. in financial management from Pace University. She is also editor of "The Americas," a weekly column that appears every Monday and deals with politics, economics and business in Latin America and Canada.

Criticism[edit]

Many of O'Grady's columns or opinion articles published in the WSJ have been challenged by diverse critiques.[1][2] O'Grady has consistently taken a conservative stance on events in Latin America, opposing many of the leftist political movements that have arisen there in recent years, and supporting right-of-center governments like that of Alvaro Uribe in Colombia.

Some left-leaning pundits have attempted to discredit O'Grady's accusations about Latin American governments, such as her claim that Fidel Castro was making viruses to share with Islamic fundamentalists,[3] and her assertion that Hugo Chavez and Daniel Ortega were providing "havens" for Islamic terrorists.[4]

Phillip Cryan also wrote a piece for Counterpunch in 2004 listing many of the allegedly false claims made by O'Grady in her columns.[5] Other critiques include "Venezuela's Voters Have Spoken" --Jimmy Carter responding to a WSJ article by O'Grady.[6]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]