Sangin airstrike

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Sangin airstrike
Date July 23, 2010
Location Sangin, Helmand province, Afghanistan
Result estimated 39-52 people killed, mostly women and children

The Sangin airstrike refers to the killing of a large number of Afghan civilians, many of whom were women and children, in the village of Sangin in Helmand province, Afghanistan on July 23, 2010.

Early reports claim that between 45-52 residents were killed as mortar shells hit a mud house, where civilians had taken refuge from fighting. A large number of civilians including children were also injured and treated at Kandahar hospital.[1][2][3] For weeks, US military and North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) officials denied that there had been any such incident.[4][5]

About 200-400 people took to the streets in Kabul protesting against the killing of civilians by foreign troops, carrying the photos of those who died in the airstrike.[6][7]

The Karzai government sent investigators to the scene of the incident, who concluded that 39 civilians were killed in the rocket strike, lower than the initially reported 45-52. According to their investigation all 39 dead are women or children.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Loyn, David (2010-07-25). "BBC News - Nato probes reports raid killed 45 Afghan civilians". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  2. ^ Jon Boone in Kabul and Ali Safi in Kandahar. "Helmand residents accuse NATO of deliberate attack on civilians killing 52 « RAWA News". Rawa.org. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  3. ^ "7 children injured in troops-militants battle in S. Afghanistan". News.xinhuanet.com. 2010-07-24. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  4. ^ "NATO Expresses Regrets Over Afghan Civilian Deaths In Military Operation". Rttnews.com. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  5. ^ "Kabul: US-led raid killed 39 civilians". Presstv.ir. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  6. ^ "Demonstrators hit the streets of Kabul". Itn.co.uk. 2010-08-01. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  7. ^ "Stories:Afghans protest alleged NATO civilian deaths". Australia Network News. 2010-08-02. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 

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