Sperm–cervical mucus contact test

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The sperm–cervical mucus contact test is an in-vitro slide test used for detecting antispermal antibodies.[1] It is one of the investigations done for infertility. It should not be confused with Kurzrock–Miller test, where there is interface between the two materials; whereas in this test the materials are thoroughly mixed.

Procedure[edit]

Equal quantities of sperm and mucus are mixed, so there is no interface. If there are antispermal antibodies present, more than 25% sperms show shaky movements.[2][3] Cross-checking the cervical mucus with another donor semen will confirm whether antibodies are cervical or seminal.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mortimer, David (1994). Practical laboratory andrology. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 188–189. ISBN 9780195065954. 
  2. ^ Kremer, J; Jager, S (March 1976). "The sperm–cervical mucus contact test: a preliminary report.". Fertility and sterility 27 (3): 335–40. PMID 1254029. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Padubidri; Daftary (2011). Shaw's Textbook of Gynaecology, 15e. p. 204. ISBN 9788131225486