St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill

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St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill
A stone church seen from the northwest.  The tower is battlemented, and the relatively small plain body of the church extends beyond it
St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill, from the northwest
St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill is located in Gloucestershire
St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill
St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill
Location in Gloucestershire
Coordinates: 51°35′33″N 2°15′47″W / 51.5926°N 2.2630°W / 51.5926; -2.2630
OS grid reference ST 818 882
Location Oldbury-on-the-Hill, Gloucestershire
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website Churches Conservation Trust
History
Dedication Saint Arild
Architecture
Functional status Redundant
Heritage designation Grade II*
Designated 6 September 1964
Architectural type Church
Style Gothic
Groundbreaking 13th century
Specifications
Materials Stone, stone slate roof

St Arild's Church, Oldbury-on-the-Hill, is a redundant Anglican church near the village of Oldbury-on-the-Hill, Gloucestershire, England. It is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building,[1] and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.[2] The church is dedicated to Arilda, a female saint who was a virgin and a martyr. This is one of only two churches dedicated to her, the other being nearby at Oldbury-on-Severn.[3] Access to the church is across fields or through a farmyard.[2]

History[edit]

The church originated in the 13th century,[2] although most of its fabric dates from the late 15th or early 16th century.[1] Repairs were carried out in the 18th century.[2]

Architecture[edit]

St Arild's is constructed in stone with a stone slate roof.[1] Its style is Perpendicular.[2] The plan consists of a nave and chancel, with a small north porch, and a west tower. The tower is in three stages divided by string courses, with diagonal stepped buttresses in the lowest stage. Also in the lowest stage is a two-light arched west window. The middle stage has a small lancet window on the west side, and on all sides in the highest stage are two-light louvred bell openings. At the top of the tower is a battlemented parapet. The north porch is gabled, and in the north wall is a three-light ogee-headed window. On the south side of the nave are four windows of different types. The east window in the chancel has a three-light window containing Decorated (geometrical) tracery.[1]

Internally there is a tall pointed tower arch. The ceiling is plain and plastered. Some 18th-century box pews are still present on the south side of the church, and there is also a two-tier pulpit.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]