Stanisław Stadnicki

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Stanisław Stadnicki.PNG

Stanisław Stadnicki (c. 1551, Nowy Żmigród or Dubiecko – 1610, Tarnawiec), a Polish nobleman, Lord Starosta of Żygwulsko (Sigulda), a known troublemaker, called 'the Devil of Łańcut' (Polish: diabeł łańcucki) for his violent behaviour. Lord of the castle in Łańcut. Enemy of Jan Zamoyski, Grand Chancellor of the Crown in 1606 he became one of the leaders of the rokosz of Zebrzydowski. From his Łańcut castle he organised many assaults (zajazdy) at the estates of Łukasz Opaliński and Anna Ostrogska.

Married to Anna Stadnicka, father of Zygmunt Stadnicki, Władysław Stadnicki, Stanisław Stadnicki (junior) and Felicjana Stadnicka. After his death, his family carried his tradition of trouble-making, with his wife earning the nickname of the Łańcut devil-woman and his sons, the Łancut devil-children.

"Skarga's Sermon", a painting by Jan Matejko. Stadnicki is standing in the center, third from right.

He died on 20 August 1610, when he was confronted with an overwhelming force loyal to Łukasz Opaliński, and didn't manage to evade pursuit to return to his own men.

Stanisław Stadnicki is one of the characters on the painting by Jan Matejko: Kazanie Skargi (The Sermon of Piotr Skarga).

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