Taguchi loss function

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The Taguchi Loss Function is graphical depiction of loss developed by the Japanese business statistician Genichi Taguchi to describe a phenomenon affecting the value of products produced by a company. Praised by Dr. W. Edwards Deming (the business guru of the 1980s American quality movement),[1] it made clear the concept that quality does not suddenly plummet when, for instance, a machinist exceeds a rigid blueprint tolerance. Instead "loss" in value progressively increases as variation increases from the intended condition. This was considered a breakthrough in describing quality, and helped fuel the continuous improvement movement that since has become known as lean manufacturing.

Overview[edit]

The Taguchi Loss Function is important for a number of reasons. Primarily, to help engineers better understand the importance of designing for variation.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Deming, W. Edwards (1993). The New Economics: For Industry, Government, Education. MIT Press. ISBN 0-911379-05-3.