Talk:Beta-Methylamino-L-alanine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Chemicals (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Chemicals, a daughter project of WikiProject Chemistry, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of chemicals. To participate, help improve this article or visit the project page for details on the project.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Molecular and Cellular Biology (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Molecular and Cellular Biology. To participate, visit the WikiProject for more information.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Different chemical?[edit]

Is Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (sometimes spelled ß-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine) the same chemical? Badagnani 16:23, 31 January 2007 (UTC)

Yes...the "N-methyl" indicates a substituted amide. N-methyl amino acids are peptides analogues that are--due to the lack of amide protons--less polar (increasing their oral bio-availability) and not degraded by common proteases. I'll make redirects to the above, plus ß-N-methylamino-L-alanine, ß-methylamino L-alanine, & ß-methylamino-L-alanine. -- Scientizzle 18:33, 31 January 2007 (UTC)

Thanks, I see in the article referenced at Fat choy that the Hong Kong scientists quoted say that the "N" stands for "nothing." It is confusing that the compound has different (alternate) names, but redirects and mentions of the alternate names in the article will help a lot. Please note that the symbol I gave is a German s-set (double s) and that the proper symbol would probably be the actual Greek beta. Thanks for your expertise. Badagnani 20:40, 31 January 2007 (UTC)

Thanks for the note on the beta...I'll fix that. β-methylamino-L-alanine β-N-methylamino-L-alanine β-methylamino L-alanine
RE: the reference from Fat choy [1], I have no idea where "Beta-Nothing-Methylamino-L-alanine" came from, but that's almost certainly not what the N stands for. N-methyl simply means a methyl group is attached to the nitrogen... -- Scientizzle 22:28, 31 January 2007 (UTC)

Fat choy[edit]

Shouldn't fat choy be mentioned in this article? Badagnani (talk) 06:59, 28 December 2008 (UTC)

Role of Cyanobacteria[edit]

The article mentions production of BMAA by cyanobacteria, but then implies that it comes from cycad seeds. There seems to be a gap here. If I recall correctly, it has been suggested that the cycads acquire it from associated (commensal?) cyanobacteria. Perhaps the article should explore this. JlTsurkov (talk) 01:25, 2 March 2012 (UTC) The cyanobacteria live symbiotically in the roots of the cycads. It is interesting that cyanobacteria are ubiquitous and that all known species of cyanobacteria have been found to produce BMAA. This suggest possible widespread environmental exposure to the toxin.

Mechanisms[edit]

I recently conducted research into to the mechanisms of toxicity of BMAA. While writing my thesis I found lots of information on the mechanisms of toxicity, specifically acute effects of BMAA after reacting with the blood buffer forming BMAA carbamate and causing cytotoxicity by acting on glutamate receptors, and the chronic effects (area of my research) caused by misincorporation into nascent peptides causing misfolding and aggregation in neurones leading to apoptosis. I have never done any editing on wiki or even left comments before but I think this article does not have very much information regarding this neurotoxin and I may be able to provide some help. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.176.92.136 (talk) 04:34, 3 April 2013 (UTC)