Talk:Industrial computed tomography

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Cleanup[edit]

This has the beginnings of a nice article, pictures and references are good, but the text sectioning and flow of the article needs attention, hence the cleanup tag.Billlion (talk) 10:49, 15 May 2011 (UTC)

File:Webcam CT transmissions.OGG to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Webcam CT transmissions.OGG will be appearing as picture of the day on November 9, 2012. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2012-11-09. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page so Wikipedia doesn't look bad. :) Thanks! howcheng {chat} 17:32, 8 November 2012 (UTC)

Picture of the day

Industrial computed tomography scanning is a process which uses X-ray computed tomography to produce three-dimensional representations of components both externally and internally, such as this scan of a webcam. Industrial CT scanning has been used in many areas of industry for internal inspection of components. Some of the key uses for CT scanning have been flaw detection, failure analysis, metrology, assembly analysis and reverse engineering applications.

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Should move Industrial computed tomography scanning to Industrial computed tomography[edit]

Computed tomography (or CT) is a process of taking many 2D views through an object and, through software, combining them into a 3D model. Industrial computed tomography is CT in the service of industry. Industrial computed tomography scanning is redundant. I think the article should be moved to Industrial computed tomography. Thoughts? -- Dan Griscom (talk) 03:28, 25 January 2014 (UTC)

Yes I agree, "scanning" is redundant. Actually your definition of tomography is slightly wrong in this context, although that was the original meaning. Typically industrial tomography uses cone beam systems and the 3D image volume is formed directly rather than slice-by-slice. Billlion (talk) 16:59, 28 January 2014 (UTC)
Interesting. Now I think I got my description wrong even based on my (old) knowledge. I should have said that CT is done with a point X-ray source and a line sensor, producing a 1D density graph. The source and sensor are rotated around the subject, and used to compute a 2D density graph of a slice through the subject. The process repeats again and again through different slices of the subject, forming a 3D density graph. But, you're saying the process is accelerated by using a 2D sensor that captures a 2D density image of the entire subject as seen from a single point source? Are many of these 2D images combined to create a 3D density graph? (This would be great to add to the article, if supported.) -- Dan Griscom (talk) 18:00, 28 January 2014 (UTC)
Article moved (thank you User:Tokyogirl79). Now, User:Billlion, it would be great to add more info on older/newer techniques. -- Dan Griscom (talk) 10:32, 30 January 2014 (UTC)
Yes that is right. Most industrial CT systems are cone beam which mean they use a 2D detector. Have a look at systems by Zeiss/Xradia, Nikon Xtek etc. The reconstruction algorithm most often used is a variation on that of L. A. Feldkamp, L. C. Davis, and J. W. Kress http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josaa/abstract.cfm?uri=josaa-1-6-612. It is approximate but works ok for small cone angles. Billlion (talk) 18:58, 1 February 2014 (UTC)