Tay River (Ontario)

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Coordinates: 44°52′43″N 76°06′46″W / 44.87861°N 76.11278°W / 44.87861; -76.11278
Tay River
River
Country Canada
Province Ontario
Region Eastern Ontario
County Lanark
Part of Saint Lawrence River drainage basin
Source Bobs Lake
 - location Lanark Highlands
 - elevation 162 m (531 ft)
 - coordinates 44°45′34″N 76°31′21″W / 44.75944°N 76.52250°W / 44.75944; -76.52250
Mouth Lower Rideau Lake, Rideau River
 - location Drummond/North Elmsley
 - elevation 125 m (410 ft)
 - coordinates 44°52′43″N 76°06′46″W / 44.87861°N 76.11278°W / 44.87861; -76.11278
Length 95 km (59 mi)
Basin 850 km2 (328 sq mi)
Location of the mouth of the Tay River in southern Ontario
For other places with the same name, see Tay River (disambiguation).

The Tay River is a river in Lanark County in Eastern Ontario, Canada.[1][2] It is in the Saint Lawrence River drainage basin and is a left tributary of the Rideau River.

Course[edit]

For a map showing the river course highlighted on a topographic map, see this reference.[2]
This river starts at Bobs Lake and leaves the lake, controlled by a weir, near the community of Bolingbroke in geographic South Sherbrooke Township,[3] part of the municipality of Tay Valley. It heads northeast, passes under Lanark County Road 36, reaches Christie Lake and passes there into geographic Bathurst Township.[4] It continues northeast, passes under Lanark County Road 6, and divides into two channels; the right channel is known as Scotts Snye. The river then travels through the community of Glen Tay, continuing to Perth. The river splits into two main channels as it flows through downtown Perth. The two channels have recombined by the time it leaves Perth and continues to the Rideau River, which drains via the Ottawa River into the Saint Lawrence River.

The river is 95 kilometres (59 mi) in length and drains an area of 850 square kilometres (330 sq mi).[5] A canal connects the river to the Tay Canal, and Rideau Canal systems at Beveridge Bay on Lower Rideau Lake.

Economy[edit]

A controversy erupted in 2002 when Swiss multinational OMYA applied for a permit to take up to 4,500 cubic metres (158,900 cu ft) of water per day from the river at its Glen Tay calcium carbonate plant. As a result, the permitted amount was reduced to 1,500 cubic metres (53,000 cu ft) per day, subject to review in 2008.

Lakes[edit]

Lakes in the Tay watershed include:

  • Bobs Lake
  • Christie Lake
  • Crosby Lake
  • Otty Lake
  • Pike Lake

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tay River". Geographical Names Data Base. Natural Resources Canada. http://www4.rncan.gc.ca/search-place-names/unique.php?id=FCVDK&output=xml. Retrieved 2012-06-08.
  2. ^ a b "Tay River". Atlas of Canada. Natural Resources Canada. 2010-02-04. Retrieved 2012-06-08.  Shows the course of the river on a topographic map.
  3. ^ "South Sherbrooke" (PDF). Geology Ontario - Historic Claim Maps. Ontario Ministry of Northern Development, Mines and Forestry. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 
  4. ^ "Bathurst" (PDF). Geology Ontario - Historic Claim Maps. Ontario Ministry of Northern Development, Mines and Forestry. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 
  5. ^ "Tay Watershed Information". Friends of the Tay River. Retrieved 2012-06-08. 

Other map sources:

See also[edit]

External links[edit]