Trois mélodies, Op.7 (Fauré)

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Trois mélodies is a set of mélodies for solo voice and piano, by Gabriel Fauré. It is composed of "Après un rêve" (Op. 7, No. 1), one of Faure's most popular vocal pieces, "Hymne" (Op. 7, No. 2), and "Barcarolle" (Op. 7, No. 3). The songs were written between 1870 and 1878.[1] They were not, however, originally conceived together as a set of three; the opus number 7 was imposed on them retrospectively in the 1890s, almost 20 years after their first publications.[citation needed]

"Après un rêve"[edit]

In Après un rêve (originally published in 1878), a dream of romantic elopement with a lover, away from darkness, and towards an awakening light is described. However, the dreamer longs to return to the "mysterious night". The text of the poem is an anonymous Italian poem freely adapted into French by Romain Bussine.[2]

"Hymne"[edit]

"Hymne" is set to a poem by Charles Baudelaire. The meaning of the text in "Hymne" is vague to those not aware of Baudelaire's ongoing theme of paradox (as the meaning is quite apparent in his other works): the spirituality of what is sensual and the sensuality of what is sanctified. Fauré's setting of the text centers subtly around this idea. "Hymne", just like "Après un rêve", retains an ethereal mood. The unchanged harmonic motion after "Forever hail!" indicates the entrance to the untroubled world of spirituality. After the word "sel" which literally means salt but in this case refers figuratively to something engaging, the harmony begins to change. Under a soft, but highly chromatic piano line the stanza about "incorruptible love" brings the song to a dramatic climax. After this stint, the piece returns to its tranquil state; however, the piece does end with the melody's tonic note and the piano's leading tone clashing for a stunning effect. The phrase "Sachet toujours frais...travers la nuit" is omitted by Faure.[4]

"Barcarolle"[edit]

Rhythm passed between the singer and the piano

The text for the third piece in the set, "Barcarolle", was written by Marc Monnier. This piece remains typical of barcarolle form by using the buoyant flow of a 6/8 time signature. Throughout the song, the rhythmic figure, which consists of an eighth note tied to three triplet sixteenth notes, followed by another eighth note, is passed between the voice and the piano.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gabriel Fauré - Choral Wiki
  2. ^ Answers.com: Après un rêve Accessed February 13, 2008.
  3. ^ a b Après un rêve (The Lied and Art Song Texts Page: Texts and Translations to Lieder, Mélodies, Chansons and other Classical Vocal Music) Accessed February 13, 2008.
  4. ^ Meister, B: "Nineteenth-Century French Song: Fauré, Chausson, Duparc, and Debussy", pp. 27, 28. Indiana University Press, 1980.
  5. ^ a b Hymne (The Lied and Art Song Texts Page: Texts and Translations to Lieder, Mélodies, Chansons and other Classical Vocal Music) Accessed February 13, 2008.
  6. ^ Meister, B: "Nineteenth-Century French Song: Fauré, Chausson, Duparc, and Debussy", pp. 29, 30. Indiana University Press, 1980.
  7. ^ a b Barcarolle (The Lied and Art Song Texts Page: Texts and Translations to Lieder, Mélodies, Chansons and other Classical Vocal Music) Accessed February 13, 2008.

The texts used in this article are public domain

External links[edit]