ALCO RSD-4

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ALCO RSD-4
Kennecott Copper Company Locomotive 201 - 1.jpg
Kennecott Copper Corporation locomotive 201 on display at Snoqualmie Depot, Snoqualmie, Washington
Type and origin
Power type Diesel-electric
Builder ALCO
Model RSD-4 (Specification E1663)
Build date 1951–1952
Total produced 36
Specifications
AAR wheel arr. C-C
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Trucks ALCO trimount
Wheel diameter 40 in (1,000 mm)
Minimum curve 21°
Wheelbase 42 ft 3 in (12.88 m)
Length 56 ft 6 in (17.22 m)
Width 10 ft 1 78 in (3.096 m)
Height 14 ft 5 14 in (4.401 m)
Locomotive weight 278,860 lb (126,490 kg)
Fuel capacity 800 US gal (3,000 L)
Prime mover Alco 244
Engine RPM range 1000 (max)
Engine type Four stroke diesel
Aspiration Turbocharger
Displacement 8,016 cu in (131.36 L)
Generator GE 5GT-581A1
Traction motors (6) GE 5GE752-C1
Cylinders V12
Cylinder size 9 in × 10.5 in (229 mm × 267 mm)
Performance figures
Power output 1,600 hp (1.2 MW)
Tractive effort 69,700 lb (31,600 kg)
Kennecott Copper Corporation locomotive 201 on display at Snoqualmie Depot, Snoqualmie, Washington.

The ALCO RSD-4 was a diesel-electric locomotive of the road switcher type rated at 1,600 horsepower (1.2 MW), that rode on three-axle trucks, having an C-C wheel arrangement.

Used in much the same manner as its four-axle counterpart, the ALCO RS-3, though the six-motor design allowed better tractive effort at lower speeds. Due to the inadequate capacity of the main generator, this model was later superseded in production by the ALCO RSD-5

Original owners[edit]

Railroad Quantity Road Numbers Notes
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway
10
2100–2109
Chicago and North Western Railway
5
1515–1517, 1619–1620
Central Railroad of New Jersey
14
1601–1614
Kennecott Copper Corporation
1
201
Preserved
Utah Railway
6
300–305
Total 36

Preserved units[edit]

The only ALCO RSD-4 that has survived is Kennecott Copper Corporation #201. As of 2007, it resides in fully restored condition at the Northwest Railway Museum (formerly known as the Puget Sound & Snoqualmie Valley Railway) in Snoqualmie, Washington, wearing a coat of bright orange paint.

References[edit]

  • Dorin, Patrick C. (1972). Chicago and NorthWestern Power. Superior Publishing. p. 141. ISBN 0-87564-715-4. 
  • Pinkepank, Jerry A. (1973). The Second Diesel Spotter’s Guide. Milwaukee, WI: Kalmbach Publishing Company. p. 247. ISBN 0-89024-026-4.